Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism, multimedia journalist

10 Online News Association Panels Relevant to Digital Journalists

The 18th annual Online News Association (ONA) conference is happening this week in Austin, Texas.  The conference has become the must-attend event for digital journalists and storytellers. Full disclosure  — I’m currently VP of the ONA board, running for re-election and I’d really appreciate your support. Keep up with NABJ members attending the conference via the hashtag #NABJAtONA.

It’s well known that attending ONA isn’t cheap. Every year, the conference sells out because people see the value it brings to the table. But one of the many things I love about this particular event is how open and accessible it is.

If you can’t be in Austin, you can still join us — for FREE — thanks to our amazing video, audio and social teams that cover almost every workshop. And we’re also doing, for the first time, we’re also doing the ONA on Air podcast, which will be available on Soundcloud, Google Play, Apple Podcasts and Stitcher.

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Look at the “How’s My Story Doing? Custom Analytics and Empowered Local Newsrooms” workshop. The Audio and Screen symbols mean that this particular session will be live streamed and also have audio available. You can also sign up to gets notifications when the live stream and social conversation begin. Not every session will be live streamed, but between that, audio and social, you’ll get access to the majority of our programming. It’s not like being in Austin, but it’s pretty close.

So below are my picks of 10 workshops that can help digital journalists of color remain relevant in their newsrooms.

  1. 11th Annual Tech Trends For Journalists (AUDIO & VIDEO): This is THE must-attend session of the convention every year. If you had the chance to see a version of journalist and futurist Amy Webb’s presentation at NABJ’s Philadelphia convention in 2011, then you know what I’m talking about. If not, check out a presentation where Webb will blow your mind via insights into what trends will impact journalism, what tools are on the horizon and how newsrooms can use them, while also avoiding potential disruption.

  2. Notes from the Journalism Diaspora (AUDIO & VIDEO): This year’s NABJ Region I conference included a Diversity and Management training program led by former Deputy Regional Director Nicki Mayo. One of the panels, “New management and leadership skills for journalists,” featured Justin Ellis, a journalist who wrote for Neiman Lab and ESPN the magazine. At that time he had taken a job as a researcher on former “Daily Show” correspondent Wyatt Cenac’s new HBO show “Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas.” As newsrooms continue to cut editorial jobs, this panel discusses how journalists can develop skills that are useful within and outside of news media.
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    Screenshot of AirTran Airways’ website on Aug. 15, 2000.

    Setting the Record Straight by Going Wayback (AUDIO): If you attended my NABJ Innovation Bubble workshop, “Tools & Apps for Digital Journalists,” you know that one of the tools I highlighted was the Wayback Machine, The Internet Archive, which allows anyone to see archived versions of web pages going back to 1996. Site director Mark Graham will discuss how newsrooms and journalists can use it to build out their archive-sourcing capabilities and leverage the internet’s long memory because it’s true — just because you delete it or archive it doesn’t mean it’s gone forever.

  4. Vicarious Trauma Response Planning (AUDIO): We’ve had a year when it comes to covering traumatic events. This is a great panel for newsroom leaders and reporters on how to plan for this coverage and ensure that teams leave room for self-care.
  5. Beyond Audiograms: Audience Engagement in Podcasting (AUDIO): It seems like we’re seeing news-related podcasts being released on the regular. But it’s not enough to just throw one out there. In this workshop, panelists will look at things like social metrics, SMS, chatbots and Facebook groups that are portable, scalable concepts that promote products while also fueling storytelling.

  6. Alerts, Apps and Algorithms: Loyalty in a Mobile-First World (AUDIO): It seems like new and updated digital tools come out every day. This workshop is designed to help newsrooms building mobile channel strategies, decision makers trying to understand where traffic and loyalty intersect and anyone trying to get a handle on the impact of mobile OS-driven algorithms.

  7. Subscriptions, Metrics and the Newsroom: How Journalists are Getting Involved (AUDIO): Online newsrooms have always had a focus on these topics, but legacy newsrooms have been slower to the game. But we know that metrics are driving how stories are written and who stays and goes based on the numbers. This session is for anyone looking to get a handle on how to read conversion metrics.

  8.  Ten Secrets of Fast Writing and Powerful Storytelling (AUDIO & VIDEO): As newsroom leaders and editors push to create content to feed the beast, sometimes you can feel like you’re constantly grinding and not telling the stories you want to tell. This workshop helps you balance speed with good storytelling.

  9.  Meet Me IRL (AUDIO): Texas Tribune FestivalSlate Day! A Podcast Experience. Washington Post Live. Blavity’s AfroTech. Newsrooms are using these types of events to not only connect with their audiences but to help shore up the bottom line. Check out how they’re doing it and get tips on how your newsroom can map out a strategy to run them successfully.

  10.  Beyond Facebook: How to Survive and Thrive After Newsfeed Changes (AUDIO): Facebook, for good or bad, has become an important tool for newsrooms to push out their content. But every time you think you’ve mastered the algorithm, change comes, causing chaos to your feed. This panel will discuss how you can use tools like Reddit, Flipboard and Pocket to keep their audiences and reduce their reliance on things like Facebook and Google.

 

 

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, journalism

10 Things I Learned At #ONA17

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I thought I’d go ahead and get this down on the blog while it’s still fresh in my mind. If you didn’t attend this year’s Online News Association conference in D.C., you missed one of the best events of the year.  Here are 10 things I learned — and start getting ready for #ONA18 in Austin, Texas!

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The ONA HBCU Digital Fellows with Instructor Michael Grant and Nikole Hannah-Jones of the New York Times.

1. I’m excited about the new generation of digital journalists of color. Between the HBUC Digital Fellows, the CNN Diversity Fellows, the MJ Bear Fellows and the ladies I met at the ProPublica Diversity Breakfast, I think we’re pretty well covered as they all move ahead in their careers.

2. Michelle Johnson of Boston University and Katia Hetter of CNN kick ass! These women, along with their team of mentors, ran this year’s Student Newsroom and Innovation Lab. Not only did they oversee the stories written by students, but they also focused on innovations including new tools and creative storytelling. Check out their stories and innovation here.

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#NABJatONA

3. #MediaDiversity is alive!! I saw it in what was a record number of overall and diverse attendees in D.C., and NABJ, NAHJ, AAJA and NLGJA were all represented. This is impressive because it wasn’t so long ago that there were conferences where I could physically count the diverse attendee. I also saw it on the panels and at the sold-out diversity reception.

Doug-Mitchell4. There are employers who want to do better. We had more than 20 hiring managers attend year three of “Workshop for Inclusive Recruitment, Hiring and Retention.” Led by Doug Mitchell, speakers (including me) discussed trends and tips on creating and maintaining diverse newsrooms.

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5. Amy Webb STILL rocks with her “10 Tech Trends For Journalists” session. We all know that you need to get there early if you want a seat. This year, Amy handed out free copies of her book, “The Signals Are Talking: Why Today’s Fringe Is Tomorrow’s Mainstream” and Google set up their coffee bar to have us caffeinated for her talk. If you saw her presentation at NABJ Philly in 2011, you’ll know exactly what I mean. Click here for access to a Dropbox with all her data for the trends. And click here to watch the one-hour presentation.

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Tiffany Lew, me and Ayumi Fukuda Bennett, left. Ayumi’s sketchnote of the #ONA17 opening keynote address.

6. Sketchnoting is a thing. For real! I was a mentor at the ProPublica Diversity Breakfast and I was paired with Ayumi Fukuda Bennett and Tiffany Lew (who are both great). When I asked Ayumi what she did, she pulled out a Moleskin notebook and POW — it was an amazing sketchnote of the opening #ONA17 keynote address. She does this live and is done with a sketch 20 minutes after a session is over.  See a video of her doing her thing here. Follow her on Twitter and check out her website on Medium. And seriously — you need to hire her for your next workshop, panel or event. Seriously.

7. Facebook is here to help. They held office hours on the exhibit floor where specialists took appointments to teach skills. I took the CrowdTangle and Instagram consults and I can’t wait to play with them. You can check out some lessons here.

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8. The ONA Midway was a great place to get down and dirty with tools and tech. I’m sad that I only had a few minutes in this cool space.

9. We have another stellar (and diverse) group of ONA board candidates. You can check out the video from the Lighting Round session, where 11 board candidates made their pitches on why they should be one of the five candidates elected.

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10. There wasn’t enough coffee!! There was a coffee shop on site and Google had a coffee bar across from registration. But the lines for both were always long, so I got my java fix in the Student Newsroom and the very kind folks at the Knight Foundation Lounge.

Benét J. Wilson is the board secretary for Online News Association. She is the immediate past VP-Digital of NABJ. She is an independent aviation journalist and content writer based in Baltimore. 

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, journalism

Get Your Eat on in New Orleans!

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I’m not going to lie-I’m a girl who likes a good meal. And in New Orleans, you always eat well, even if you’re broke. My mother’s family is from Lousiana, so I grew up eating food like crawfish etouffee (see above), red beans and rice, muffuletta and po boy sandwiches.

Below are five places I try not to miss when I visit the Crescent City.

1. Compere Lapin. The brainchild of former “Top Chef” contestant (one of my show favorites) Nina Compton, this restaurant blends Caribbean and New Orleans cuisine that’s delicious.

2. Clover Grill. This is down home diner cooking at its best. They cook the burgers under a hubcab, and they are among the best I’ve ever had. And the amusing attitudinal waitstaff is a bonus!

3. Deanie’s Seafood. I took Dr. Syb Brown during the last NABJ convention here in 2012. The seafood is fresh and the portions are massive. A large catfish/shrimp platter is more than enough for two!

4. HiVolt Coffee and BakeryI’m a big fan of this eatery, which has great coffee and is famous for its breakfast sandwiches and breakfast bowls.

5.  Daisy Dukes.  Just on the edge of the French Quarter, it’s open 24/7 and has great breakfast options. But it’s also known for its $8 bottomless Cajun Bloody Marys.

Pre-registration for the convention ends on June 1, so register here. I’ll see you in New Orleans!!

Posted in Education, journalism

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

JANUARY

  • Join the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force for a virtual conference “New Year, New You,” on Saturday, Jan. 11 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. In four hour-long sessions, attendees will learn mobile journalism tips and tricks, how to create an online portfolio, steps needed to create your journalism brand and taking your resume to the next level. Click here for more information.
  • If you have the skills, passion and determination to be a journalist of the future – a trained professional who knows a good story when they see it and who has the confidence to tell it in a way that best imparts its relevance and importance to news consumers – an 18-month Hearst Fellowship may be right for you. Applications are open through January.

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free workshop, “Investigating the Business of Government,” Jan. 23, 2014, preceding the Winter Convention of the Kentucky Press Association Jan. 23-24. If you dread analyzing the annual municipal budget for news and wonder how to tie government contracts to campaign-donor lists, come hone your skills at this workshop taught by investigative reporter John Cheves. The workshop will be held at the Hyatt Regency, 401 W. High St., Lexington, Ky.
  • The Reynolds Fellowship in Community Journalism is accepting applications. This fellowship is be awarded to “a journalist of accomplishment and promise who is committed to the role of the community press.” Open to journalists working at a U.S. daily and weekly newspapers with a circulation less than 50,000, journalists doing online work for community newspapers, or journalists who have established independent local news websites in communities where the circulation of the local newspaper is less than 50,000. Must be a U.S. citizen. Deadline: Jan. 31, 2014. Apply now.
  • The Nieman-Berkman Fellowships in Journalism Innovation are a collaboration between two parts of Harvard (the Nieman Foundation for Journalism and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society). This fellowship involves spending a year in residence in Cambridge, and full participation in both the Nieman and Berkman fellowship communities. Applicants must propose a specific course of study or project relating to journalism innovation. Open to working journalists or others who work for a news organization in a business, technology, or leadership capacity. Independent journalists are also welcome. Deadline: Jan. 31, 2014.Apply now.

FEBRUARY

  • The Knight-Wallace Fellowships at Michigan is now accepting applications. Spend an academic year at the Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Fellows devise a personalized study plan with access to UM courses and resources, and are encouraged to nurture their creative and artistic tendencies. Includes twice-weekly seminars as well as domestic and international travel. Deadline: Feb. 1, 2014. Apply now: U.S. and international.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free workshop, “Perfecting Personality Profiles,” Feb. 5-6 at 4:00 p.m. ET (noon PT). To make your beat coverage more accessible and engaging, you need to focus on people – those in positions of power or influence, and those who consume goods and services, work for wages and pay taxes. In the first hour of this lively two-part webinar, Pulitzer winner Jacqui Banaszynski will explore the characteristics of memorable and accurate profiles, as well as offer a range of profile approaches that can suit your purpose, publication and audience. In the second hour, on Feb. 6, she’ll dive more deeply into the reporting and writing techniques that can help any beat reporter pursue sparkling profiles.

MARCH

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free workshop, “Social Media ROI for Journalists,” March 4 at  4:00 p.m ET (noon PT). In 2013, more and more newsrooms will revisit their social media strategy and ask, “What’s our return on investment?” How do we know if our newsroom is doing social “correctly”? What does this mean for our organization’s bottom line? This free, one-hour webinar will help you answer those questions on March 4.

JUNE

  • The best in the business will gather for more than 100 panels, hands-on classes and special presentations about covering business, public safety, government, health care, education, the military, the environment and other key beats at the 2014 IRE conference June 26-29, 2014 in San Francisco. Speakers will share strategies for locating documents and gaining access to public records, finding the best stories and managing investigations. Join the discussion about how to practice investigative journalism in print, broadcast, Web and alternative newsroom models.

If you have items you wish to include, please email them to me at benet AT aviationqueen DOT COM. Thanks!!

Posted in Awards, Conferences & Conventions, journalism

ONA Conference and Awards Banquet 2013

This week, the online news world will gather in Atlanta for the Online News Association Conference & Awards Banquet.

From Oct. 17-19, convention goers will be able to have conversations with  top figures in digital media, network with “digi-peers” from the around the world, and best of all, check out super sessions about the latest in digital news & technology!

ONA board members Robert Hernandez, Juana Summers and Benet Wilson will be hosting the #DigitalDiversity Happy Hour at Sear in the conference hotel on Thursday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Register here, and all are welcome!

Click here to see the full program schedule. And if you can’t make it, the sessions will be made available via live streaming free of charge.

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Social Media

VIDEO: Your #NABJ13 Social Media Guide

We know that your ears eyes will be glued to all the wonderful events that #NABJ13 offers but we want to see where you are, what’s going on and who you are with!  Be sure to use #NABJ13 in all your Twitter, Facebook and Instagram posts.
We are also hosting a special contest for the Disney Launch party. Use Instagram to post videos at the Disney Launch Party. (NABJ Founders, celebrities, etc.) The Instagram video with the most likes and comments by 11:30pm will receive a prize.
PANELISTS: 
Spread the word about your panel from your personal social media platforms and @NABJ will share.  Before your panel starts, please remind attendees of the assigned hashtags.  We recommend having someone ‘live tweet’ the discussion so that #NABJ13 attendees can get the most out of the panel.

 

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism

Top Five Reasons to Apply for the Reynolds Center for Business Journalism Fellowship

By Christopher E. Nelson, NBC News Assignment Editor

Nelson at a CAR workshop in 2012 taught by Jaimi Dowdell (foreground), training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors.  Photo courtesy of Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, via Flickr.
Nelson at a CAR workshop in 2012 taught by Jaimi Dowdell (foreground), training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors. Photo courtesy of Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, via Flickr.

Last spring I was fortunate enough to receive one two Reynolds Center for Business Journalism fellowships, which allowed me to attend the Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference. For me, it was an eye-opening experience and my first real exposure to the world of business journalism.

In addition to attending the SABEW conference I was also fortunate enough to receive computer assisted reporting training through a workshop presented by the Reynolds Center in conjunction with Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc.  So here are my reasons why you should apply for this year’s fellowships.
1. The business beat is a comprehensive one.
Business reporters have to know a little about a lot. Almost every day their stories could include bits about politics, government, the economy, society and culture. If you choose to become a business journalist, you’ll learn to be a better journalist,  and without a doubt you’ll become a better informed one.
 
2. Journalists of color are underrepresented on the business beat.
As a journalist of color, you might want to consider business journalism. There are a number of business networks on TV.  CNBC, Bloomberg, and Fox Business, but also new and relatively new outlets from Atlantic Media’s Quartz to BusinessInsider.com. These outlets are making solid attempts at explaining money matters in interesting ways.
3. You’ll learn about the future of the journalism industry.
At last year’s SABEW conference, I heard more about data visualization  something I was not all that familiar with. Data visualization jobs are an emerging hot job in journalism as papers, and web outlets hire reporters who can communicate important information in a great way.
4. It’s a great opportunity to meet industry leaders who have excelled at different beats, and then made a new path by writing about business and the economy.
From Diana Henriques, who literally wrote the book on Bernie Madoff to sports business reporter Sam Mamudi to personal finance columnist Gail Marks Jarvis, I heard incredible stories from some of the best in the business about the world of business. Who would have thought you could talk crime, politics, sports, and so much more at a conference of business writers?
5. Winning a Reynolds Center Fellowship is only the beginning; it truly opens the door to what the Reynolds Center can offer you — lots and lots of FREE training.
Even after attending SABEW, I’ve found that the Reynolds Center continues to offer free training that is not only interesting, but quite informative. It’s so important to stay current on trends, and hot topics, and the Reynolds Center helps journalists to do that, free of charge.
So apply today and become one of the Reynolds Center 2013 Fellows! It’s a great experience that continues to pay off.
– Nelson is an assignment editor at NBC News based in New York. He was a 2012 Reynolds Center for Business Journalism Fellow and attended SABEW 2012 in Indianapolis.