Tag Archives: nabj

#wjchat: All About Media Diversity

Last night’s #wjchat TweetChat was all about media diversity, in honor of the late Dori Maynard of the Maynard Institute. Chatters discussed everything from continuing Dori’s legacy to what diversity in a newsroom looks like. Click here to read a fascinating discussion all about the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to media diversity.

Webinar TONIGHT – Tech & Tools Journalists Can Use

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The NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force and the Diverse Social Media Editors and Digital Journalists Facebook group is committed to helping journalists beef up their digital skills and help keep them relevant in ever-changing newsrooms.

Tonight we’re unveiling the first of a free series of digital skills webinars — New Year, New You, Part 2.  At 8:30 p.m. ET, we’re holding our first webinar, “Tech & Tools Journalists Can Use.” Our panelists — Benet Wilson, Emma Carew Grovum, Ingrid Sturgis, Marissa Evans, Jeannine Hunter and Romy Camille — will share and demonstrate their favorite tools, websites, apps and technology. We’ll take your questions and the webinar will be recorded for those who can’t make it. Our media partner for this event is AllDigitocracy.org.  You can still register, here.

Help Fund The Beacon Reader Project “HOW’D YOU GET THAT (MEDIA) JOB?”

Tracie Powell.

Tracie Powell.

Tracie Powell currently serves as the co-chair of the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force. She is also founder, editor and publisher of the amazing AllDigitocracy.org website, which has quickly become the go-to website for digital diversity media issues.

But things like AllDigitocracy.org don’t run on good will alone. Good journalism needs to be funded, which is why I’m asking you to consider donating to Tracie’s Beacon Reader project, “How’d You Get That (Media) Job?” Under the project, Tracie will do high-quality video interviews with diverse industry movers and shakers on how they ended up with the jobs they’re in.  The first one, below, is with Roland Martin, a past NABJ board member, media entrepreneur and host of TV One’s “Washington Watch with Roland Martin.”

Non-whites make up nearly 40 percent of the U.S. population, but only 12 percent of U.S. newsrooms. That’s according to a report released in 2013 by the American Society of News Editors (ASNE). The organization also found that 90 percent of newsroom supervisors at organizations that participated in the study were white.

Similarly, the Radio Television Digital News Association found that while the minority population of the United States has risen 10.4 percent, the minority workforce in television news is up only 3.7 percent, and the minority workforce in radio is up 0.9 percent. RTDNA’s 2012 diversity study also found that 86 percent of television news directors and 91.3 percent of radio news directors are Caucasian.

While women have made some progress, they still earn only 36 percent of bylines or on-camera appearances, and the number of women industry executives has declined. All Digitocracy seeks to help turn the tide by giving these journalists advice, insight and access to opportunities and by working closely with hiring managers to help make their newsrooms more representative so that they can better serve and engage with their respective audiences.

In a nutshell, All Digitocracy considers media questions and issues that aren’t covered—and your help will allow us to take this coverage even further with this new web series.

If you’re interested in funding good journalism, you can get more information here. Pledges start at only $5, but the deadline to show your support is Christmas Eve, so please consider making a donation today.

Benét J. Wilson is the vice president of education for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force.  She also serves on the board of the Online News Association.  She is coeditor of AirwaysNews.com and  a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.

10 Workshop Ideas For #NABJ40 In Minneapolis

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The call to submit workshop proposals and speakers for the 2015 NABJ Annual Convention and Career Fair in Minneapolis has been opened.  Tracks for workshops are:  Engage, Immerse, Specialize, Inform, Learn and Know.

According to the NABJ website, proposals will be reviewed based on the following criteria:

• Is the topic innovative and relevant?

• Is the session well-organized and designed to meet the needs of this particular audience?

• Are the session objectives and “takeaways” for participants clearly explained in the proposal?

Seeing this, I came up with 10 workshop ideas I hope members will submit to the Program Committee.  Remember — you can’t complain about programming if you don’t submit anything. The deadline is Sunday, Nov. 16.  Good luck!

  1. Media Ethics in a Web 3.0 World
  2. Adding a Dash of Data to your Journalism
  3. How To Make Your Web Stories Clickalicious
  4. monetizing My Blog
  5. Becoming a WordPress Rock Star
  6. How Crowd-sourcing Can Be am Effective News Gathering Tool
  7. How to break into INSERT BEAT HERE
  8. How to Develop Effective Multiplatform Stories
  9. Multimedia training for seasoned journalists
  10. How to Survive and Thrive as a Freelance Journalist

Benét J. Wilson is the vice president of education for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force and served as NABJ Program Committee chair in 2012 and 2013.  She also serves on the board of the Online News Association.  She is  the social media/eNewsletters editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and  a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.

Vote No for Proposed NABJ Constitutional Amendments

Thank you members of the NABJ Constitutional Committee for your hard work on our governance model and structure.

The amendment to change the way NABJ is governed has brought some serious debate over how our nonprofit organization should operate in a changing digital media landscape. I voted NO to amend the NABJ Constitution. Membership categories should not be expanded as outlined in the amendment.

For example, the emerging journalist category disenfranchises working journalists with less than five years experience. I joined NABJ as a student member in 1977, two years after the organization started. Like so many other young people during the first five years of our careers, we paid our dues, found our way to regional meetings, and if we were lucky, the national convention. By any means necessary.

As young leaders, we sought out leadership. We served in NABJ local chapters. We positioned ourselves to run for a seat on the national board. Our next generation of journalists should experience the extraordinary times that we did. And more.

We should not create an emerging journalist membership category that excludes members from serving on the national board during the first five years of their careers.

Sheila Brooks is a former NABJ Secretary (1986-91), a three-term national board member, founder of NABJ-TV and the NABJ Monitor, and NABJ member since 1977

Vote No to the NABJ Constitutional Amendment

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Thank you to members of the National Association of Black Journalists’ Constitutional Committee for your leadership and service. Your commitment to NABJ is commendable.

I voted NO to amend the NABJ Constitution for two reasons: one, this proposed new governance structure has no immediate profitable fiscal impact on NABJ. Rather, it increases the size of an already 14-person BIG board. So why remove two board positions and create two new board positions?

Over the past few years, the downturn in the economy has set a new standard among nonprofit leaders to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their operations. That said, it’s prudent to reduce board positions and keep travel and expenses at a minimum. Let us also remember that in recent NABJ elections, we did not attract enough candidates to run for national office. Many of those seats were filled as appointments by a new president.

Two, the amendment doesn’t represent an overhaul of our governance model. Instead, it is the same structure we set up 40 years ago, with the addition of board members. Again, more costs. What we need is a national leadership model that outlines a financial sustainability plan to rely less on our cash reserves that are becoming more difficult to replenish year after year.

Therefore, I cannot support this amendment to the NABJ Constitution.

Sheila Brooks is a former NABJ Secretary (1986-91), a three-term national board member, the founder of NABJ-TV and the NABJ Monitor, and an NABJ member since 1977.

Take Your Journalism Career To The Next Level: Sign Up For The Executive Suite

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Every year at the National Association of Black Journalists Annual Convention & Career Fair, members looking to move up the career ladder have access to a unique program: The Executive Suite, July 30-31, 2014.

The Executive Suite is an exclusive series of workshops led by news and corporate executives designed to help middle managers who aspire to more senior roles to gain a better sense of what it takes o be an executive editor, a publisher, a news director or a general manager.  Attendees of the two-day program walk away with a better understanding of the skills and relationships it takes to land and keep those jobs. From hiring and managing to building the skills and connections you’ll need to move up, the Executive Suite will help you prepare for advancement.

The speakers read like a who’s who of media executives, including:

  • David Boardman, President, American Society of News Editors;
  • Jill Geisler, Senior Faculty, Leadership and Management Programs, The Poynter Institute;
  • Deborah Adams Simmons, Vice President, News Development, Advance Local;
  • Alfredo Carbajal, Managing Editor, The Dallas Morning News/Al Dia;
  • Mizell Stewart, Senior Vice President, News, E. W. Scripps Newspapers; and
  • Ingrid Ciprian-Matthews, Vice President, News, CBS News.

And there will be a special event on Thursday, July 31 when Keith Woods, Vice President of Diversity for NPR leads a conversation with Arthur O. Sulzberger, Jr., Publisher of the New York Times, and Dean Baquet, Executive Editor, of the Times.

The good news is that they are still taking applications — but only until Friday, July 25. So if you think you have what it takes — or know someone else who does — send an email coordinator Duschene Drew, Managing Editor for Operations, Newsroom at the Star-Tribune at  ddrew@startribune.com. And please put  Executive Suite in the subject line. In the email, tell him why you think you deserve to be in the Executive Suite. It wouldn’t hurt to include a resume or a link to your portfolio website. And please — pass this along to anyone you think may benefit from this great programming in Boston!

Benét J. Wilson is the vice president of education for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force.  She also serves on the board of the Online News Association.  She is  the social media/eNewsletters editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and  a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.