Posted in multimedia journalist, Social Media

#Occupy Mobile Journalism

By Talia Whyte, founder and director of Global Wire Associates and freelance journalist

For the last few weeks, the Occupy Wall Street movement has taken over the headlines worldwide and put the future of the global economy up for discussion.  Based on the quickness this movement has grown in such a short amount of time, there are clearly strong feelings out there among the general population about the current financial system.

As a freelance journalist I not only find this to be a monumental moment in recent history, but it is also a great opportunity to practice mobile journalism.  As technology and digital tools to capture information on the go becomes more common, many reporters are spending more time on the ground, filing stories online and interacting with followers on their social networks.

I live in Boston where the Occupy movement has both fascinated and angered local residents and politicians.  I have visited the Occupy Boston site located in the city’s financial district multiple times just so I can better understand what the group’s complaints, demands and recommendations are for improving the system.

Anyone who follows me online knows that Twitter has become my BFF in the last couple of years.  I have been using the social network on my Blackberry to tell the stories of the “Occupiers,” as well as tweeting out pictures of the activities in their tent city.  My followers have been re-tweeting my posts and I have been getting feedback from others all over the world.  The feedback has been good for me because I have gotten many ideas for future stories.

I generally cover issues concerning Boston’s communities of color, so I was quick to notice the lack of people of color in this movement. I put this observation up to my Twitter and Facebook followers, as well as my email correspondents, and had quite a discussion about how the role of race plays in this debate.

Luckily in the last month, there have been two major rallies involving mostly people of color taking on economic issues that directly impact their communities.  National housing justice organization Right to the City made noise in Boston last month, when 2,000 activists rallied in front of a Bank of America, protesting its alleged predatory lending practices towards vulnerable customers.  Twenty-four people were arrested during the protest for trespassing on the bank’s premises.  This was a great opportunity to use my Flip camera to interview both victims of foreclosure, as well as those who were arrested during the protests.

I did the interviews because I wanted to put real faces on this pressing issue.  Again, I received inspiring feedback online from professional journalists and activists alike that sparked further discussion about the issue at hand.

The other rally I attended with my trusted Flip camera just last week was the first gathering of Occupy the Hood Boston – the first such gathering in the country to address issues directly affecting communities of color.  I captured on video tear-jerking footage of a woman who lost her nephew last summer to gang violence.

I also used Twitter to report on the many speeches given by community leaders on a wide range of issues, including police brutality, education and black unemployment.

One thing I learned so far from doing mobile journalism is the importance of keeping it simple.  There has been much discussion in recent years about what a backpack journalist is supposed to use for equipment.  Many technological advances have made it possible for journalists to do more with less.  All I use for my field reporting, especially in an ever-changing protest situation, is a Blackberry and a Flip camera.

Also, my mobile journalism in the last few weeks has helped expand my personal brand.  I have more people looking out for my work online, including more editors contacting me about doing freelance assignments using my digital skills.  Being open to using many platforms for storytelling really does help further your career.

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Posted in Conferences & Conventions

Hey Mashable – How About Adding Some Color To Your Media Summit?

By Benet J. Wilson, chair, National Association of Black Journalists’ Digital Journalism Task Force and independent multimedia journalist

I am a big fan of Mashable.  I have it in a high spot on my Google Reader, and I also have the app on my iPhone.  I appreciate how they keep me up to date on all things social and digital media.  But I have a bone to pick.

Mashable is holding its annual Media Summit in New York City on Nov. 4.  The event has become one of the hot conference tickets in the social/new media realm.  But there’s a problem.  When you look at the list of speakers, there’s no people of color on the agenda — not one.  And I have a problem with that, since this is an issue that has come up again and again in the past few years.

Did you not read my blog post on the lack of diversity at last December’s News Foo invitation-only event at Arizona State University spurred by a post by NABJ member and ASU professor Retha Hill on the event? Did you not check out a PBS MediaShift Twitter chat in January asking if people of color are missing at new media conferences?

Mashable, how could you miss this spreadsheet created by Star-Tribune multimedia journalist (and Asian American Journalist Association member) Emma Carew and curated by other journalists of color (including me) listing journalists of color that are doing amazing things in the new media space and want to talk about it?  And here’s my blog post explaining the project.

And if that weren’t enough, check out this great panel discussion on the diversity in new media held at last month’s Online News Association annual convention.  The panel was moderated by Retha Hill and ANY of her speakers — including Joel Dreyfus, managing editor of TheRoot.com AND a founder of NABJ — could more than hold their own at your Media Summit, Mashable.

And Mashable, why didn’t you look in-house and tap the talents of Jessica Fay Carter, who has blogged for you on…wait for it…new media/social media diversity issues.  She is the CEO of Heta Corporation, an advisory firm that helps companies use social technologies to engage women and multicultural groups—as consumers and employees.  She is also the founder of Black Social Media Professionals.

As an online publication that has its finger on the pulse of all things new media, I find it really hard to believe that you either couldn’t find people of color or just decided not to include them.  Either way, it’s a bad call.  I’ll help you out and give you 10 names off the top of my head (outside of the ones already mentioned in this blog) that would be assets to your summit.  I hope you take me up on adding them or others.

  1. Dr. Michelle Ferrier, LocallyGrownNews.com & professor at Elon University;
  2. Bruce Koon, news director at KQED;
  3. Sam Diaz, a Silicon Valley-based freelance writer, ghost writer and communications consultant;
  4. Dagny Salas, web editor for Voice of San Diego;
  5. Dori Maynard, president The Maynard Institute;
  6. Elise Hu, NPR’s digital coordinator of the StateImpact initiative;
  7. Mark Luckie, National Innovations Editor at the Washington Post and author of “The Digital Journalists’ Handbook”
  8. Robert Hernandez, professor at USC/Annenberg;
  9. Shawn Williams, president, Dallas South News; and
  10. Sree Sreenivasan dean of student affairs & professor at Columbia Journalism School, contributing editor, DNAinfo.com and
    co-founder, south asian journalists association.
Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism, Social Media

Calendar of Multimedia Training, Events & Fellowships

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

Webbmedia Group has a great calendar of events that catches things not covered below.  If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click hereYou can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box.)

The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University has updated its calendar of free workshops and webinars through November.  And Media Bistro has its current course list available through December.

Ongoing: Steve Buttry, director of community engagement and social media for Journal Register Co., is teaching the Poynter News University course Introduction to Reporting: Beat Basics. This free, self-taught course helps you identify the key issues and sources on your beat, learn how to determine what’s included in your beat and develop the resources to focus your coverage.

OCTOBER

  • The Society of Environmental Journalists will hold its 21st annual conference in Miami Oct. 19-23.  Meet journalists from throughout the hemisphere — Chile, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina and more — and learn what issues they face reporting on the environment.
  • Blogalicious will he held Oct. 21-23 in Washington, D.C.  Founded in 2009, the Blogalicious Weekend conferences are aimed at celebrating the diversity of women of all ethnicities in social media.
  • Journalism Interactive: The Conference on Journalism Education & Digital Media will be held Oct. 28-29 at the University of Maryland-College Park. The event will explore the intersection of digital media and journalism education.  Early-bird full conference registration is $150; day passes are $85.

NOVEMBER

  • The Scripps Howard Foundation Wire is taking applications for reporting internships in Washington, D.C., for the spring and summer 2012 semesters.  Interns report and write a variety of stories. Interns also talk with experts at the Capitol, the Supreme Court, the Student Press Law Center, the Washington Post, the State Department, the Pentagon and others to better understand how to cover the news. Interns should be prepared to cover government, politics, breaking news, business, sports and features.  The deadline to apply is Nov. 1.
  • Fast Company will hold its “Innovation Uncensored” event Nov. 2, 2011, in San Francisco.  Join Fast Company for a day of thoughtful, provocative and uplifting conversation.  Frontline leaders from a variety of industries will share progressive thinking and engage in candid conversations – what went right – what went wrong – and more importantly, what’s up next? Tickets are $375 through September 23, $450 after September 23. Buddy passes are available, buy 1 ticket for $375, get the 2nd for only $250 (valid through September 23rd).
  • BlogWorld & New Media will be held Nov. 3-5 in Los Angeles.  The conference is the first and only industry-wide conference, tradeshow and media event dedicated to blogging, podcasting, social media, social networking, online video, music, Internet TV and radio. The New Media Expo provides the only industry-wide new media marketplace for networking, online business and marketing resources, while the Social Media Business Summit is the world’s largest social media business conference where business owners, marketing executives and global brands learn strategies, tools and technologies to grow their businesses with social media. Register at blogworldexpo.com with the promo code MASH20 to save 20% off the ticket price!
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a one-day seminar, “Introduction to Covering the Green Economy: Las Vegas,” Nov. 4 in conjunction with the Association for Alternative Newsmedia.  The workshop will introduce journalists to the business behind the green economy.  The cost is $25.
  • Nov. 15 is the deadline for college juniors, seniors and graduate students who have demonstrated an interest in and aptitude for copy editing to apply for several scholarships awarded each year by the ACES Education Fund, an affiliate of the American Copy Editors Society. The scholarships are open to students who will be college juniors, seniors or graduate students in the fall, and to graduating students who will take full-time copy editing jobs or internships.
  • The Freedom Forum Diversity Institute is holding its Advanced Multimedia Boot Camp, Multimedia Training for Journalism Professionals and Educators Nov. 16-20, in Nashville, Tenn., at the John Seigenthaler Center. Learn things including: shoot and edit a mini-documentary; create a WordPress blog to host a project; use Google Maps and add images and video; and incorporate Twitter and Facebook Connect on your blog.  The cost is $850 for the course.

DECEMBER

  • The International Radio and Television Society Foundation is now taking applications for its 2012 Summer Fellowship Program.  The program teaches up-and-coming communicators the realities of the business world through an expense-paid fellowship, which includes practical experience and career-planning advice. Each year college juniors, seniors and graduate students are selected nationwide to participate in the nine-week Summer Fellowship Program.  The deadline to apply is Dec. 1.
  • WordCamp Orlando will be held Dec. 3 at UCF’s Rosen College of Hospitality Management.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free webinar, “Quick-Hit Business Investigations — Concept to Execution” Dec. 6 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EDT. Matt Apuzzo, investigative reporter at the Washington bureau of The Associated Press will provide practical advice on how to pull off investigations that might take one to two weeks.

JANUARY 2012

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold the Strictly Financials/Business Journalism Professors Seminars in Phoenix, Ariz., Jan. 2-5, 2012.  The center is offering 24 fellowships worth $2,000 each for four days of study in business journalism for experienced business journalists and prospective business journalism professors.  Fellowships cover training, lodging, materials and most meals. Fellows receive a $500 stipend to offset travel and other costs.
  • The Scripps Howard Foundation and the Arizona State University’s Cronkite School are offering fellowships to journalism professors interested in introducing entrepreneurial concepts and practices into their teaching of journalism. The five-day institute, Jan. 4-8, 2012, will immerse participants in the concepts and practice of entrepreneurship. Held at the Cronkite School’s state-of-the-art facility in downtown Phoenix, it will be led by Dan Gillmor, author of “Mediactive” and an internationally known speaker and thinker on new media and entrepreneurship. Gillmor will be joined by entrepreneurs, investors and Cronkite faculty.  The deadline to apply is Nov. 1.

FEBRUARY

APRIL

•           The Scripps Howard Foundation Wire is taking applications for its one-year, post-graduate, multimedia fellowship, beginning in late summer 2012.  The fellow manages and maintains its website and The fellow creates multimedia projects for the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire’s website, works with undergraduate interns to develop multimedia projects and provides leadership to a team to produce news stories and projects.  The fellowship includes a $21,000 stipend ($500/week for 42 weeks), plus free housing in a furnished apartment shared with the program’s undergraduate interns. The fellowship does not include benefits and will not result in a job.  The deadline to apply is April 1.

If you have any items that I’ve missed, please drop me an email via the DJTF Yahoo! Listserv or at benet AT aviationqueen DOT com.  Thanks!

Posted in journalism

Another Journalist Layoff: My Own Story

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair

It was just another Tuesday. I was judging an airports concession contest, then was going back to the office at 1 p.m. for what I thought was a group meeting. I briefly thought it was odd that most of my colleagues were still sitting at their desks, but shook it off. I was called to a conference room where I saw two company leaders, and I knew.

The whole process was very cordial and professional. I listened to the talk, took the packet and thanked them for a great five-year run. Who else do you know that gets paid to do their hobby, their passion? My last day is October 21. One would think that I would be devastated, but really, I’ve been amazingly optimistic. I chatted with a few of my co-workers (actually consoling them), then I went home.

On the train ride home, I started tapping into the network I’ve amassed after almost 20 years in the aviation business.  I’ve also tapped my rapidly growing new/digital media network for leads.  And the response has been wonderful. I’ve picked up some freelance work, and I already have two job interviews scheduled.  Thanks to Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+ and Twitter, I have hundreds of folks (and their own contacts) on the lookout for any opportunities for me.  And dear readers, if you hear of anything, you can let me know at benet@aviationqueen.com!

So below are five tips from me to you to use if you get laid off — or if you’re already laid off and looking.

  1. Give yourself no more than a day to mourn (I took all of 15 minutes). The deed is done, and you need to focus your energies on looking for your next opportunity.
  2. Have a resume ready.  I spent a happy five years at my soon-to-be former employer, but I always kept it ready.  I have it on a thumb drive on my key ring, along with a copy on my iPhone, so I can send it from anywhere at any time.  I was able to send my resume to three friends on my train ride home Tuesday.
  3. Create/update your LinkedIn profile. One of my job interviews came from this network.  My profile was 95% complete, but I needed recommendations.  I tapped my network again, asking for recommendations on my listed jobs. This brings you to the attention of potential employers.
  4. Don’t be afraid to use social media.  One thing you DON’T want to do is bash your former employer. Tell people you’re out and ask them to pass along any opportunities they may hear of.  I already have 4 leads from a Facebook post coming from others contacts.
  5. Think outside the box.  People are asking me what I want to do next.  I want to stay in journalism, but I’m not going to limit myself to that.  So I’m looking at communications/PR, community manager, social media consultant, aviation media/marketing efforts and anything else I think will fit my unique skills.

So here’s to finding that next adventure!!

Posted in Uncategorized

10 Steps to Being a Better Student Journalist

NABJ 2011 Multimedia Short Course at FAMU

By Ameena Rasheed, Texas Southern University Journalism Major

I was able to attend the 2011 NABJ Multimedia Short Course at Florida A&M University, Sept. 8-11 and it was an exceptional experience. I learned a wealth of information that made me a better journalist and I feel the need to share those skills that I learned with my fellow NABJ students. Here we go!

1. This first tidbit is one that I received from Florida A&M University Professor Dorothy Bland. Expand your network and get involved in a multitude of journalism and professional organizations. From the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) to the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), there are a plethora of associations you can join to diversify your network. Try to shy away from keeping your circle of connections “strictly chocolate.”

2. Make sure you not only know current events, but details about historical events in history like 9/11. Don’t forget about government officials (President’s Cabinet and Supreme Court Justices) and international dignitaries. REMEMBER: Spelling counts, so make sure that you know the names of these people backwards and forwards. Many news organizations, like CNN, give current events quizzes to future employees. The last thing that you want to do is end up unemployed because of something like a misspelled name.

RESUMES! Because we are journalists, we have a certain way with words and come up with catchy headlines at the drop of a hat. However, maybe it’s just me, but nothing vexes me more than trying to construct that perfect resume. Numbers 3 – 6 are pertaining to resumes.

 

3. General assignment reporter for KCRA-TV 3, Sacramento, Ca., Damany Lewis, explained that the pesky “objective” section should be nowhere on your resume. Your objective should only be placed in your cover letter.

 

4. When it comes to formatting, list your experience first and your skills, and education afterwards.

 

5. If you have work experience that isn’t unique and doesn’t pertain to journalism, keep it to yourself. However, if you have had some experience studying abroad or are fluent in a foreign language, include that in your resume.

 

6. Always make sure that your resume is written in AP style. A resume is your first impression and you want to show an employer that you know how to write.

 

7. Benjamin Davis, who was recently hired as a Florida A&M University CBS Dow Visiting Professor said that knowing HTML is a must-have skill for today’s young journalist.

 

8. Speaking of the Internet, do you have a website or blog? If so, KUDOS to you. If not, shame on you. No one can market you like you can. Create a platform for yourself online where people can see your resume, video reel, newspaper clips and whatever else you have done.

 

9. Rod Carter, of WFLA in Tampa, Florida, advised students that when putting together a video reel, to shy away from panoramic shots when shooting. Use wide shots, mid shots and close ups when filming.

 

10. Last, but certainly not least. The “YES” philosophy. In the opening ceremony for the NABJ short course, Jill Cox-Cordova, broke down one of her keys to success.

 

Y– Your brand. What is it? What are the things that no one can take from you? Integrity, hard working, attentive? Figure out what you are about.

E – Embrace a support system. Make sure that you have a mentor.

S – Skills. Know how to do it all and at the same time, become the go-to person for a certain something. Whether it is website design or producing video, find your niche.

Feel free to add in any other tips in the comments section and make sure that you check out the FAMU-NABJ blog: http://nabjmsc2011.wordpress.com/. I hope I was able to help another fellow NABJ student with me sharing what I learned from the short course. As you began to progress, you must always look back and help your peers. You have to “lift while you climb.”

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism

Calendar of Multimedia Training, Events & Fellowships

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

Webbmedia Group has a great calendar of events that catches things not covered below.  If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click hereYou can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box.)

The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University has updated its calendar of free workshops and webinars through November.  And Media Bistro has its current course list available through December.

Ongoing: Steve Buttry, director of community engagement and social media for Journal Register Co., is teaching the Poynter News University course Introduction to Reporting: Beat Basics. This free, self-taught course helps you identify the key issues and sources on your beat, learn how to determine what’s included in your beat and develop the resources to focus your coverage.

OCTOBER

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free, one-day Business Journalism Boot Camp in Minneapolis, Oct. 4. In this free, daylong workshop, you’ll learn the basics of business for public companies, private companies and nonprofits. Award-winning professors and journalists will have you analyzing financial statements to find stories about public companies, as well as tracking public information on private companies and nonprofits. Learn how to dissect the new IRS Form 990 line-by-line to find stories about local nonprofits. Examples will be tailored to the Minnesota market.
  • Join the deans of journalism — Nicholas Lemann, dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and contributor to The New Yorker magazine, and Stephen B. Shepard, dean, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and former editor of Business Week magazine — as they trace the transforming changes in the news industry.  They will host More than Money with Myron Kandel on Oct. 5, 7:30 – 9:00 PM at JCC Manhattan. To register, please call 646-505-5708. The cost is $10 for members, $15 for non-members.
  • The Newswomen’s Club of New York is holding an event, “How to Cover the Biggest Police Force in the Nation,” Oct. 6 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the
    NYC Seminar and Conference Center.  Hear from the reporters assigned to the Police Headquarters beat, or the “shack,” about what it takes to get reliable, timely information out of the department, handle sensitive information appropriately, and build sources. Panelists will include Murray Weiss of DNAinfo.com, Colleen Long, of the Associated Press, Lorena Mongelli, of the New York Post and John Doyle of the NY Daily News.  The cost is $5 for Newswomen’s Club of New York members; $15 for non-members.
  • The Freedom Forum Diversity Institute is holding its Advanced Multimedia Boot Camp, Multimedia Training for Journalism Professionals and Educators Oct. 12-16, 2011, and Nov. 16-20, in Nashville, Tenn., at the John Seigenthaler Center. Learn things including: shoot and edit a mini-documentary; create a WordPress blog to host a project; use Google Maps and add images and video; and incorporate Twitter and Facebook Connect on your blog.  The cost is $850 for the course.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free one-day workshop, “Digital Efficiency for Business Journalists — 36 Tips to Tame Info Overload,” in New York City Oct. 13.  It will include 36+ specific sites, tools and techniques for those who face a growing mass of digital information. The half-day session is not about theory or about how big the problem is, but instead about how to make each working day more efficient by using specific tools, techniques and best practices.
  • The Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) is holding its annual fall workshop at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism, 219 W. 40th St., New York City, Oct. 13-14, 2011.  SABEW members can register for $179, and non-members can register for $229.  Top editors of Bloomberg News, Dow Jones and Reuters — Norman Pearlstine, Robert Thomson and Stephen Adler, respectively — will discuss the present and future of the news business at the 6 p.m. October 13 reception at the school.
  • The Poynter Institute’s News University is holding a day-long video seminar, “Video Storytelling with the Pros: Lighting, Writing and Surviving,” Oct. 16, starting at 10:00 a.m. EDT.  Spend a day in this video workshop, co-sponsored by the National Press Photographers Foundation, learning how award-winning professionals work through the storytelling process.  The cost is $65.00.
  • The Society of Environmental Journalists will hold its 21st annual conference in Miami Oct. 19-23.  Meet journalists from throughout the hemisphere — Chile, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina and more — and learn what issues they face reporting on the environment.
  • Blogalicious will he held Oct. 21-23 in Washington, D.C.  Founded in 2009, the Blogalicious Weekend conferences are aimed at celebrating the diversity of women of all ethnicities in social media.
  • Journalism Interactive: The Conference on Journalism Education & Digital Media will be held Oct. 28-29 at the University of Maryland-College Park. The event will explore the intersection of digital media and journalism education.  Early-bird full conference registration is $150; day passes are $85.

 

NOVEMBER

  • The Scripps Howard Foundation Wire is taking applications for reporting internships in Washington, D.C., for the spring and summer 2012 semesters.  Interns report and write a variety of stories. Interns also talk with experts at the Capitol, the Supreme Court, the Student Press Law Center, the Washington Post, the State Department, the Pentagon and others to better understand how to cover the news. Interns should be prepared to cover government, politics, breaking news, business, sports and features.  The deadline to apply is Nov. 1.
  • Fast Company will hold its “Innovation Uncensored” event Nov. 2, 2011, in San Francisco.  Join Fast Company for a day of thoughtful, provocative and uplifting conversation.  Frontline leaders from a variety of industries will share progressive thinking and engage in candid conversations – what went right – what went wrong – and more importantly, what’s up next? Tickets are $375 through September 23, $450 after September 23. Buddy passes are available, buy 1 ticket for $375, get the 2nd for only $250 (valid through September 23rd).
  • BlogWorld & New Media will be held Nov. 3-5 in Los Angeles.  The conference is the first and only industry-wide conference, tradeshow and media event dedicated to blogging, podcasting, social media, social networking, online video, music, Internet TV and radio. The New Media Expo provides the only industry-wide new media marketplace for networking, online business and marketing resources, while the Social Media Business Summit is the world’s largest social media business conference where business owners, marketing executives and global brands learn strategies, tools and technologies to grow their businesses with social media. Register at blogworldexpo.com with the promo code MASH20 to save 20% off the ticket price!
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a one-day seminar, “Introduction to Covering the Green Economy: Las Vegas,” Nov. 4 in conjunction with the Association for Alternative Newsmedia.  The workshop will introduce journalists to the business behind the green economy.  The cost is $25.
  • Nov. 15 is the deadline for college juniors, seniors and graduate students who have demonstrated an interest in and aptitude for copy editing to apply for several scholarships awarded each year by the ACES Education Fund, an affiliate of the American Copy Editors Society. The scholarships are open to students who will be college juniors, seniors or graduate students in the fall, and to graduating students who will take full-time copy editing jobs or internships.

DECEMBER

  • The International Radio and Television Society Foundation is now taking applications for its 2012 Summer Fellowship Program.  The program teaches up-and-coming communicators the realities of the business world through an expense-paid fellowship, which includes practical experience and career-planning advice. Each year college juniors, seniors and graduate students are selected nationwide to participate in the nine-week Summer Fellowship Program.  The deadline to apply is Dec. 1.
  • WordCamp Orlando will be held Dec. 3 at UCF’s Rosen College of Hospitality Management.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free webinar, “Quick-Hit Business Investigations — Concept to Execution” Dec. 6 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EDT. Matt Apuzzo, investigative reporter at the Washington bureau of The Associated Press will provide practical advice on how to pull off investigations that might take one to two weeks.

JANUARY 2012

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold the Strictly Financials/Business Journalism Professors Seminars in Phoenix, Ariz., Jan. 2-5, 2012.  The center is offering 24 fellowships worth $2,000 each for four days of study in business journalism for experienced business journalists and prospective business journalism professors.  Fellowships cover training, lodging, materials and most meals. Fellows receive a $500 stipend to offset travel and other costs.
  • The Scripps Howard Foundation and the Arizona State University’s Cronkite School are offering fellowships to journalism professors interested in introducing entrepreneurial concepts and practices into their teaching of journalism. The five-day institute, Jan. 4-8, 2012, will immerse participants in the concepts and practice of entrepreneurship. Held at the Cronkite School’s state-of-the-art facility in downtown Phoenix, it will be led by Dan Gillmor, author of “Mediactive” and an internationally known speaker and thinker on new media and entrepreneurship. Gillmor will be joined by entrepreneurs, investors and Cronkite faculty.  The deadline to apply is Nov. 1.

FEBRUARY

APRIL

•           The Scripps Howard Foundation Wire is taking applications for its one-year, post-graduate, multimedia fellowship, beginning in late summer 2012.  The fellow manages and maintains its website and The fellow creates multimedia projects for the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire’s website, works with undergraduate interns to develop multimedia projects and provides leadership to a team to produce news stories and projects.  The fellowship includes a $21,000 stipend ($500/week for 42 weeks), plus free housing in a furnished apartment shared with the program’s undergraduate interns. The fellowship does not include benefits and will not result in a job.  The deadline to apply is April 1.

If you have any items that I’ve missed, please drop me an email via the DJTF Yahoo! Listserv or at benet AT aviationqueen DOT com.  Thanks!