Posted in Education, journalism, Webinar

#MediaBoss: How to Break into Newsroom Management

I’ve been in the journalism business for more than 30 years. I have worked my way up into management, with some companies doing a great job training me, while others not so much.

I was delighted when NABJ partnered with the Poynter Institute in 2016 to create the Leadership Academy for Diversity in Digital Media. The class of 25 represent emerging leaders in digital media who have demonstrated an aptitude for leadership through current projects and references.

They come to Poynter’s St. Petersburg campus for a week to receive guidance on navigating newsroom culture, leadership styles, the business of journalism and entrepreneurship, as well as networking and one-on-one coaching. I’m honored to be one of the instructors of this amazing program, which trained its second class in December 2017.

It’s important that the next generation of diverse leaders get training here, because they may not be in newsrooms that support their efforts. So when I put out the call for the 2016 cohort to do a management webinar, Nicole Smith of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution stood up and created this webinar.

Smith has created a unique master class — with panelists Erica Henry of CNN, Herman Wong of the Washington Post and Indu Chandrasekhar of Wired magazine — for those who are ready for the next level. In this webinar, attendees will learn how to bolster your leadership skills, gain career allies, nurture relationships, and articulate vision to a team. Click here for more information and to register for this free, hour-long webinar.

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Posted in Education, journalism, Webinar

New Year, New You: So You Want To Be A Sports Journalist

According to Marketwatch, Americans spent $100 billion on sports in 2017. Nearly $60 billion of that was to attend sporting events, while another $33 billion was spent on sports equipment, on which Americans spent $33 billion.

And according to Forbes magazine, 50 sporting teams — from the Dallas Cowboys to the Los Angeles Angels — made its list of the world’s most valuable sports franchises valued at a minimum of $1.75 billion. Forbes noted that 36 franchises worth at least $1 billion — including three NFL teams, eight Major League Baseball teams and seven of NBA teams did not make the top 50.  And this doesn’t include other sports like Nascar, tennis, soccer, track and field and other categories.

There’s a lot of sports to be covered, and even more journalists who want to cover them all. So the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force partnered with the NABJ Sports Task Force to show members what it takes to make the cut covering sports teams.

The moderator is Task Force Chair Marc Spears, senior NBA writer for ESPN’s The Undefeated. He’s joined by former Task Force Chair and NABJ President Greg Lee, editorial director of NBA.com and Malika Andrews, a sports reporter at the New York Times and the 2016 winner of the Task Force’s Larry Whiteside convention scholarship.

So join us on Tuesday, January 16 at 8:00 p.m. EST for the webinar, which is open to everyone. Click here to register.

 

Posted in Education, journalism, News, Uncategorized, Webinar

New Year, New You: Manage Covering LGBTQ Communities (Better)

One of the goals of the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force’s New Year, New You webinar series is to help members do their jobs smarter and better in 2018. A big way of doing that is learning how to write respectfully and with knowledge about communities and groups that may not always be ones you cover.

So we were delighted when the co-chairs of the NABJ LGBTQ Task Force — Tre’Vell Anderson and Ernest Owens (who also is the current NABJ Emerging Journalist of the year) stepped up and created this webinar.

This webinar will discuss industry reporting standards, emerging trends and areas of improvement regarding coverage of the LGBTQ communities in print, broadcasting, and digital platforms. After this one-hour event, attendees will leave with ways to intersectionally improve their newsrooms’ coverage of LGBTQ people.
Join us on Monday, Jan. 15 at 7:00 p.m. ET for what we expect to be an interesting and informative conversation. Click here to register.

 

Posted in Education, journalism, multimedia journalist, Webinar

New Year, New You: We’re Back!!

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If it’s the beginning of the new year, that means it’s time for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force’s annual “New Year, New You” webinar series. Every year, we kick off January with a series of webinars designed to help you jump-start your career. As usual, we partner with NABJ Task Forces and members to create this programming.

Usually, you must be a paid NABJ member to participate, but for January, anyone can join us. But going forward, you will need to be a paid member (local membership doesn’t count) to participate in future webinars. Click here if you want to join NABJ.

Below is a list of the webinars we have scheduled this month. And if you have ideas for future webinars email us here with your ideas and we’ll work on making them happen.  I thank all the NABJ members who have stepped up to make this happen!

New Year, New You: The Resume Edition, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 7:00 p.m. EST

Covering LGBTQ Communities (Better), Monday, Jan. 15, 6:30 p.m. EST

#MediaBoss: How to Break into Newsroom Management, Monday, Jan. 15, 8:00 p.m.

Posted in Education, journalism, Webinar

New Year, New You: The Resume Edition

It’s almost a tradition that we kick off the New Year, New You webinar series with a resume review session with Benét Wilson, an aviation journalist and NABJ’s immediate past VP-Digital. She’s done hundreds of resume reviews for everyone from students to executives and has her own business for those who need help.

Benét has partnered with NABJ Student Board Representative Kyra Azore to do a resume webinar. In this session, she will offer her top 10 tips to use to craft a resume that won’t get thrown away. She will also do live resume reviews and answer your questions. This session is for students, but anyone is welcome to join us on Wednesday, Jan. 10 at 7:00 p.m. EST. Click here to register.  Hope to “see” you there!

Resume Webinar

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism

Start Preparing for #NABJ18 in Detroit – NOW!

Saving for #NABJ18.pngOK. I know we’re still recovering from the very successful #NABJ17 in New Orleans. For those of you who didn’t make it this year, yes — it was just as great as it appeared on your friends’ myriad social media posts. You can click here for my summary on just what you missed.

If you’re already preparing for next year’s convention in Detroit, I applaud you, but this post isn’t for you. This one is for the following people:

  • Those with hard-core FOMO, who always vacillate whether to come or not then get mad when they don’t;
  • Those who want to attend the convention but have no idea how to pay for it;
  • Those — PLEASE pay attention — who think throwing up a GoFundMe account a month or less away from convention is a good idea; and
  • Those who email me, NABJ VP-Print Marlon A. Walker and other NABJ members sob stories about how they want to go but have no money (and asking me for “an airline hook up”) one to two weeks before the convention.

There are two journalism conferences I attend every year — NABJ and the Online News Association. I, like you, know that these events happen every year. Back in 2012, DJTF did a TweetChat with Natalie “The Frugalista” McNeal on ways to save. I encourage you to read it because the tips are still pretty good.

I began saving for both in June of the year before the conventions; that means I started saving for #NABJ18 and #ONA18 in June. I use the Smarty Pig website, which automatically takes out a designated amount twice a month (you can choose your own deposit schedule). I never see the money, so there’s no temptation. There are also apps like Digit and Qapital that are designed to help you save.

You need to break down your expenses: airfare, hotel, transportation to/from the airport, city transportation, food/drink, tips and gifts/souvenirs. You also need to save for things like clothing, hair, nails/grooming, business cards and a resume/portfolio website.  Once you get that number, divide it by 10 and start saving — today.

Other ways to raise funds for Detroit include a part-time job or side hustle and using birthdays, Christmas and Kwanzaa (specifically Kujichagulia, Self-Determination) to ask for things like registration, airfare and hotel costs.  And save on costs by sharing a room (I’ve had roommates every year since 2008), attending the free professional breakfasts and lunches (bonus-you’ll learn something) and sharing transportation. Most mentors will also help with a meal or drinks, especially if you are a student.

Don’t get me wrong — I have and will continue to help those who are also working to help themselves. This year I paid to register a professional and a student. I also gave $25 grants to help folks with expenses in New Orleans and did several free resume reviews. And I fully expect to help folks get to Detroit.

You now know what you have to do nearly a year in advance. But be warned — if you email me asking for help, or I see you posting one of those last-minute GoFundMe, my reply to you will be this column. So come correct and start saving now. Only 345 more days until NABJ hits the Motor City!!

 

 

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism, Uncategorized

Aunt Benet’s Top 10 Student Etiquette Tips for #NABJ17

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As a certified (but young at heart) old fogey, I chat with my fellow fogeys (and some who are not quite fogeys) regularly about how the journalism industry has changed — for better or for worse.

But one thing that remains the same is the need for proper manners and etiquette when dealing with more experienced journalists, most of whom will be the people who will either hire you for your next job. And allow me to keep it real — some of you have major issues with interacting with people in real life because you spend too much time looking down and glued to your smartphone

So as the NABJ convention fast approaches next week, please indulge me and read my 10 tips — which I offer with love in my heart — on how to interact with your elders in New Orleans.

  1. Please address your elders properly. If you don’t personally know someone, it is not cool to informally email them or call them by their first name in person. Even at my advanced age, I do not refer to anyone I don’t know personally by their first name. Once they give permission, then have at it. Remember to start the email with hello or some other greeting and their name, and end it with regards/best/sincerely and your name. And you get bonus points if you have a signature line with all your contact information. Wise Stamp offers a free one here.
  2. Check out the NABJ exhibitors lists. Now is the time to download the convention’s Guidebook app, see who will be there and who’s on your must-see list. Once you’ve done that, start reaching out and asking – politely – for times to meet. And don’t rule out early breakfasts or late evening coffee or drinks (if you’re old enough).
  3. Ditch your friends.  You can see them anytime.  Did you spend all this money to get to New Orleans just to spend time with the same people you see every day? This is your golden opportunity to meet new people and build your networks, so take advantage of that and hang with your friends when you get home.
  4. Dress for the job you want. You will be attending a conference with nearly 3,000 professionals from across the country. Some may be dressed casually, but that does not apply to you. Think of this conference as one big job interview and networking opportunity, so dress accordingly. Skip the colored hair, concert/political t-shirts, ripped jeans, wrinkled clothes, those cool new kicks, crop tops and too-short skirts and shorts. Think tailored and professional, with stylish but appropriate suits and dresses and no tennis shoes or flip flops.
  5. Stop texting and start speaking to people, damn it! Conference attendees will be wearing name badges, so put down the smartphone and look up. You need to walk up to someone, introduce yourself and start a conversation. You never know where it might lead (click here to read where it led for Brionna Jimerson at #NABJ13).
  6. Make eye contact. While you’re doing the speaking thing, don’t be afraid to look people in the eye. It shows that you’re interested and engaged.
  7. Say thank you and offer a firm handshake after speaking with people. This is the best way to make that final good impression before you part ways with someone who could have a major effect on your career.
  8. Ask for a business card or contact information. It may be old-fashioned, but you are building your network. So you need to collect information from people who may be able to help you with things like scholarships, internships, references and even jobs. And have yours ready to hand over too.
  9. Write and snail mail a thank-you card to everyone you meet at #NABJ17. The art of writing is becoming a lost one. Stand out from the crowd by sending a handwritten thank-you card to people who made an impression. Trust me — this goes a long way. Bring pre-stamped cards and mail them on the day you leave New Orleans.
  10. Have fun — but not too much fun. There will be time built in for fun activities, but remember where you are. People will remember the one who got sloppy drunk in the hotel lobby bar. This is not the impression you want to leave in New Orleans.

The NABJ convention is a great opportunity to meet and interact with the people who will help you navigate your journalism/communications career. Come correct and take full advtange of it! Love, Aunt Benét