Posted in Conferences & Conventions, multimedia journalist

New Year, New You – The Recordings

Thanks to everyone who participated in our four webinars, created to help you get a jump start on your career in 2014.  UPDATE – We now have all  four recordings uploaded for your viewing pleasure:

We will post the other two as soon as possible.  And watch this space for our next event, Freelance February!

Benét J. Wilson serves on the board of the Online News Association. She is the immediate past chair of the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force and is the social media/eNewsletters editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.  She is also a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.

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Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism

DJTF Presents “New Year, New You” Virtual Conference

newflyer

2014 is right around the corner, and the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force is ready to help you get ready for it, career wise.  We are holding a “virtual” conference on Saturday, Jan. 11 with four workshops that will help you take your job to the next level in what we’re calling “New Year, New You.”

Jeremy Caplan of the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism will show off his journalism tips and tricks to help you do your job smarter and better. Michelle Johnson of Boston University will show you the tools you need to create and maintain your online portfolio.

Dr. Sybril Bennett of Belmont University will show you the tools you need to create and publicize your journalism brand. And Benet Wilson, DJTF vice president of education and the eNewsletters/social media editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association will offer tips on how to make your resume stand out with potential employers.

Here’s the schedule and the link to register (all times EDT):

You can attend the workshops you want, and the event will be recorded for those who can’t attend the live sessions.

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, multimedia journalist, Technology

Resources To Build That Perfect Portfolio Website

By Benét J. Wilson, chair, NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force & social media/eNewsletters editor, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association

Editor’s note: please join me for a free webinar, “Top 10 Dos and Don’ts for Resumes,” on Tuesday, July 9 at 9:00 p.m. ET.  I’ll offer my tips and do three live demos of my famous resume review. Please share this link and encourage folks to attend. It will be recorded for those who can’t make it.

As preparation continues for this year’s National Association of Black Journalists Annual Convention and Career Fair, I can feel the excitement and preparation that is taking place.  One of the key items you need to have in time for the convention is an online portfolio where potential employers can see your work all in one place.

Michelle Johnson, Associate Professor of the Practice, Journalism at Boston University, NABJ Educator of the Year AND one of my digital journalism heroes, did a workshop at the 2011 Philadelphia convention –The One-minute Media Mogul: Creating Online Portfolios — that is my go-to resource.  When I got laid off in October 2011, Michelle was one of the first people I called. I wanted to get her notes from her great presentation so I could create my own portfolio.

She kindly gave me permission to share them, so here they are, as promised. I’d love to hear from you on which site you decide to use, and send links to see what you came up with.  Thanks!!

For Building a Free/Low-cost Portfolio or Website
WordPress.com
Wix.com
Tumblr.com
Weebly.com
Squarespace.com
Bluehost.com (for setting up a “self-hosted” version of WordPress)

Tips: Creating an Online Portfolio Using WordPress
WordPress is not just for blogging! It’s a full-fledged “content management system” that you can use to build a web site. With just a few tweaks, you can easily and quickly launch your own site. See these articles for details:
CUNY: Creating a Top-Notch Journalist Portfolio

How to Build a Distinctive Portfolio Site
WordPress.com vs hosted WordPress

“Self-hosted” WordPress Bluehost.com tutorials:
How to Install WordPress
Installing Themes
Setting up WordPress as a CMS
http://wordpress.forthenovice.com (videos)

WordPress.com Tutorials/Help
If you are using the free version of WordPress, look here for tips on how to configure your site: WordPress.com Support

Embedding documents
Do you want to embed :
Scribd.com – Need to embed a pdf of your resume? Try scribd.
Docstoc.com – Similiar to Scribd.
Tutorial: How to Embed PDF, Spreadsheets, etc. into WordPress
WordPress Plugin: Google Doc Embedder (Note: this works only for the self-hosted version of WordPress, not the free version.

WordPress Themes (aka templates)
Wordpress.com Theme Showcase: http://theme.wordpress.com/themes/

Note: The themes below are for “self-hosted” WordPress sites. You cannot install your own themes on the freebie sites available at wordpress.com.

Graph Paper Press: Great templates for photographers, visual types
Gabfire: For creating a news site.
Themeforest.net: My personal favorite. Tip: Click on “Wordpress” in the navigation bar first to filter out other formats.

WordPress.com vs. WordPress.org
This article compares the two.

Posted in Education, multimedia journalist, Social Media, Technology

Resources To Build That Perfect Portfolio Website

By Benét J. Wilson, NABJ Program Chair, NABJ DJTF chair & freelance aviation/travel journalist and blogger

Yesterday, Marissa Evans, a student at Marquette University, posted an item from the 10000 Words blog: 5 Free Sites to Help Journalists Build an Online Portfolio – 10,000 Words. But the good folks weren’t at last year’s NABJ Annual Convention & Career Fair discovered a better resource.

Michelle Johnson, Associate Professor of the Practice, Journalism at Boston University (and one of my digital journalism heroes), did a workshop at last year’s convention —The One-minute Media Mogul: Creating Online Portfolios — that was much more informative.  When I got laid off last October, Michelle was one of the first people I called. I wanted to get her notes from her great presentation.

She kindly gave me permission to share them, so here they are, as promised. I’d love to hear from you on which site you decide to use, and send links to see what you came up with.  Thanks!!

For Building a Free/Low-cost Portfolio or Website
WordPress.com
Wix.com
Tumblr.com
Weebly.com
Squarespace.com
Bluehost.com (for setting up a “self-hosted” version of WordPress)

Tips: Creating an Online Portfolio Using WordPress
WordPress is not just for blogging! It’s a full-fledged “content management system” that you can use to build a web site. With just a few tweaks, you can easily and quickly launch your own site. See these articles for details:
CUNY: Creating a Top-Notch Journalist Portfolio

How to Build a Distinctive Portfolio Site
WordPress.com vs hosted WordPress

“Self-hosted” WordPress Bluehost.com tutorials:
How to Install WordPress
Installing Themes
Setting up WordPress as a CMS
http://wordpress.forthenovice.com (videos)

WordPress.com Tutorials/Help
If you are using the free version of WordPress, look here for tips on how to configure your site: WordPress.com Support

Embedding documents
Do you want to embed :
Scribd.com – Need to embed a pdf of your resume? Try scribd.
Docstoc.com – Similiar to Scribd.
Tutorial: How to Embed PDF, Spreadsheets, etc. into WordPress
WordPress Plugin: Google Doc Embedder (Note: this works only for the self-hosted version of WordPress, not the free version.

WordPress Themes (aka templates)
Wordpress.com Theme Showcase: http://theme.wordpress.com/themes/

Note: The themes below are for “self-hosted” WordPress sites. You cannot install your own themes on the freebie sites available at wordpress.com.

Graph Paper Press: Great templates for photographers, visual types
Gabfire: For creating a news site.
Themeforest.net: My personal favorite. Tip: Click on “Wordpress” in the navigation bar first to filter out other formats.

WordPress.com vs. WordPress.org
This article compares the two.

 

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, journalism

What To Expect At The Online News Association Convention

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

As I prepare to attend this year’s Online News Association annual convention this  Thursday, conference co-chair — and NABJ member — Michelle Johnson passed along some good news:  many of the sessions at this week’s Online News Association conference will be live streamed. If you couldn’t make it to Boston, check out the proceedings on the conference web site, here.

Johnson also pointed out some don’t miss events, including a keynote panel on diversity issues in new media on Saturday, Sept. 24 at 9 a.m. EDT,
moderated by NABJ member Retha Hill, Executive Director of the Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship Lab and Professor of Practice at Arizona State University’s Cronkite School of Journalism.  “This kind of discussion at the keynote level is a first for ONA,” says Johnson.  “Many thanks to Retha, Joel Dreyefus, LaToya Peterson, Bruce Koon and Sam Diaz who answered my call to participate, along with a special thanks to Dr. Sybril Bennett for an assist on this.”

Check out the list of presenters at this year’s convention here.  And please support sessions from the following NABJ members and journalists of color: Kwan Booth; Joel Dreyfus; Retha Hill; Doug Mitchell; Bryan Monroe; Andre Natta; LaToya Peterson; Sam Sanders; Juana Summers; Matt Thompson; and Benet Wilson.

The Maynard Institute is holding an evening reception and discussion on Friday, Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m., Boston Marriott Copley Place, St. Botolph Room. The discussion, “The Web is Supposed to be Different, Right?” is a discussion about the latest research on online media coverage of people of color.   They will show  examples of how mainstream news web sites are not so different from legacy print sites in their lack of coverage of people of color. They’ll share some research on implicit bias, its effect on everything from health care to who gets hired, and how inclusive coverage can be a factor in altering implicit bias. They’ll also talk about Maynard programs such as Fault Lines.

The Maynard Institute wants to engage folks in a conversation about how organizations can help ONA members work on diversity issues.  The event also allows ONA attendees to enjoy sushi, wine and dessert and meet the staff.  The event is free, but please RSVP to Elisabeth Pinio: epinio@mije.org.

Academics and members of NABJ, NAHJ, AAJA, NAJA and UNITY are invited to Michelle Johnson’s meetup for academics (even if you’re not one!), Saturday, Sept. 24 at 5:30, in the Suffolk room. Her school’s springing for food and drink. 🙂

Posted in Equipment, Innovation, multimedia journalist, Social Media, Technology

Did You Love The NABJ 2011 Convention App? Here’s The Back Story

Michelle Johnson

Editor’s note: Michelle Johnson is the Associate Professor of the Practice, Multimedia Journalism at Boston University’s Department of Journalism.  She’s also the co-chair of the Online News Association’s (ONA) 2011 convention in Boston Sept. 22-25.  Below, she writes about the ubercool app that was created in conjunction with Guidebook to keep NABJ members in the know about all the events at last week’s convention in Philadelphia.  Not a bad word was said about the final project.

This all started at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. I heard that NAHJ didn’t have a conference app and wondered if we could whip one up. I knew about a company called Guidebook because we’re using them to do the ONA conference app.

Their prices are pretty reasonable, but we had zero budget, so I contacted them to ask if they might be willing to comp us an account in exchange for a sponsor logo. They said yes, and I had some students painstakingly enter the schedule into a spreadsheet which we uploaded to get the app up and running.

A week later, I heard that NABJ wouldn’t have a convention app this year because it was cost-prohibitive. So, once again I got on the phone with the CEO of Guidebook and we agreed on a reduced fee and sponsorship link. We didn’t have much time to turn this around, just a couple of days.  And NABJ, unlike NAHJ, didn’t have the schedule in a spreadsheet already. In fact, it was worse this time because it was in a pdf and there were sooo many sessions.

So me and the other student mentors — Ingrid Sturgis, Allison Davis and Jennifer Dronkers — did a cut-and-paste relay. I started by cutting and pasting from the pdf into the spreadsheet. Then I send it to Jen Dronkers at the Poynter Institute. She did a couple of hours then passed it on to Ingrid Sturgis in Washington, D.C. Ingrid worked on it and passed to Allison Davis in New York. Allison then sent the completed spreadsheet back to me in Boston around 11 p.m. We had started in the morning!  I’m not sure how many sessions it was in total, but we got the entire schedule copied over in a day, uploaded it and, bam — instant app.

I’m very impressed with Guidebook. It’s economical and offers lots of bells and whistles in the premium version. One chief advantage is that you download it to your phone. No need to be online to access it. Whenever we update it on the back end, it pushed out a notice to users that there’s a new version and offers them a download. So, that’s the story of the very first NABJ convention app.

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education

NABJDigital Interviews Online News Association Co-chair Michelle Johnson

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

I joined the Online News Association about a year ago, and am a member of the organization’s Diversity Committee.  One of the people I met at last year’s annual conference was ONA11 conference co-chair Michelle Johnson. Johnson is also a member of the National Association of Black Journalists and an associate professor of the practice, Journalism, at Boston University.  She’s a former  editor for the Boston Globe and was part of the team that launched the Globe’s award-winning regional website, boston.com.  NABJDigital interviewed Johnson about what attendees can expect ONA11 and why NABJ members should consider attending.
Michelle Johnson

NABJDigital: How did you become ONA11 conference co-chair?

Michelle Johnson: Two years ago at ONA’s conference in San Francisco, I ran into some colleagues from Boston who were chatting in the hallway and one of them collared me and said “this conference needs to be in Boston.”  I responded, “Absolutely.”  The Boston area is a serious hub of innovation across a broad spectrum of industries, including media. It will be a great showcase for what’s now and what’s next in online journalism and technology.
ND: Why should NABJ members also consider joining ONA?
MJ: As online continues to grow, it’s important for journalists of color to be on top of the trends and issues related to new media. ONA’s primary focus is online journalism, the latest trends in technology and lots of related issues such as net neutrality and the Wikileaks case. ONA’s not just for geeks. Yes, there are some geeky journalists in ONA; and there are also plenty of veteran journalists who started in traditional media, as well as folks who don’t work specifically for online.
ONA conferences are incredibly upbeat. People are practically bouncing off the walls with ideas and energy. Everyone’s excited about the growth of digital media. It’s impossible to come away from an ONA event or conference without some new ideas or knowledge.
ND: With so many journalism organizations competing for convention goers, why should NABJ members also consider attending ONA11?
MJ: Several reasons:  1) If they work for online, ONA is the place to be for networking and keeping on to top of skills and issues related directly to online.
2)  If NABJ members don’t work specifically for online but want to pick up some skills and ideas for incorporating new media tools into what they do, there’s plenty available for them, too. There’s always programming that’s meant to appeal to journalists with varying backgrounds and interests. For instance, some of the more popular sessions at last year’s convention covered the basics on how to use tools like Google and Twitter. You’d assume that everyone in ONA knows that sort of thing already. Well, guess what? Many do, but some don’t. There’s something for everyone at ONA.
3) Like a lot of the professional journalism associations, ONA has a growing segment of academic members who’ve left the industry and now teach. There’s a pretty robust academic group with a very active Facebook page.
4) We need to represent and be a part of innovating. We can continue to complain about the lack of people of color in digital media, or seek to be a part of it. We can wonder why there are no apps or sites that carry content that we care about, or we can create them.
ND: What types of programming/keynotes can attendees expect this year?
MJ: You can expect programming that’s exciting and jam-packed. We’ve gotten a ton of great proposals for sessions that will be released shortly. Some will focus on what’s hot right now. Others on what’s coming soon. Boston and nearby Cambridge are technology hubs. Cambridge is home to the MIT Media Lab, and both cities house a number of incubators working on cool media-related apps and services. We’ll be showcasing this innovation and how it’s impacting online journalism at ONA 11.
We’re also working to bring in some major names in journalism and technology, with a special emphasis on including a diverse range of voices in the sessions and the keynotes.
Attendees will also be treated to fall in New England: fantastic food, shopping, cultural and historical spots. (Don’t miss historic sites such as the African Meeting House, 54th Regiment Monument and the Black Heritage Trail.) Depending on when they arrive, attendees can also catch a Red Sox game.
ND: ONA has been criticized in the past for its lack of diversity. What is being done this year to counter that criticism?
MJ: First, everyone involved in selecting programming for ONA 11 has been given the charge to keep the mix in mind. That means looking at everything from speakers to workshops and making an effort to get everyone into the conversation. There has been some buzz of late about tech-related conferences not being that inclusive. We’re going to address that issue head-on with a session this year.
And, on a personal note, I had stopped going to ONA a few years back because I didn’t really feel that comfortable. When I returned a couple of years ago, I felt like that things had changed. It wasn’t so much that there were a slew of people of color, but I felt like those who were there were making a difference. There are people of color on ONA’s board and in the membership. If I didn’t feel like the atmosphere had changed enough, I wouldn’t be a co-chair of ONA 11.
ND: What do you think will be the top 3 things attendees take away from this year’s convention?
MJ: 1) Something new. And that could be anything from ideas and knowledge about tools and techniques to help you do your job better, to a new perspective about a timely issue. It could also be new skills. Particularly if they sign up for the pre-conference day-long workshop which will offer hands on training.
2)  Food for thought. It’s hard to walk away from ONA without having been challenged by some new idea, some thought-provoking discussion, or something that makes you say, “hmmmm.”
3) Energy and contacts. (OK, that’s two things!) Seriously, though, networking at ONA is energizing. You meet so many people doing cool stuff, it’s really uplifting.
ND: What can ONA members do to help make ONA11 successful?
MJ: Show up! We’re working hard to make this a great conference. It’s sold out for the last couple of years, so we have high expectations that will happen again.  I’m a little biased, but I think this is going to be a stellar conference. In large part ONA is great because the members are so into it. So, you’ve got a great, historic, convention city that’s a hub of innovation, and jazzed, innovative journalists. How could ONA 11 not be fantastic?
Editor’s note: registration for ONA11 is now open.  The cost is $399 for members through May 31.  The cost is $499 through July 31 and $599 through September 13.  The show sells out every year, so I encourage you to register sooner rather than later.  And AirTran and Southwest Airlines are offering some great fares to Boston around convention time!