Tag Archives: LaToya Peterson

ONA 2011 Saturday Morning Keynote: Race, Gender and Technology: The Third Rail?

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

A panel of digital journalists, led by NABJ member Retha Hill confronted questions of diversity often lost in the new media technology and economy discussion: Who is online? Who is innovating? What”s the environment for entrepreneurs? What”s the history of women and people of color in digital journalism?

Above: Sam Diaz and Retha Hill.
Saturday Morning Keynote: Race, Gender and Technology: The Third Rail?

Moderator Retha Hill started off with a quiz on the history of diversity in media. Attendees barely passed. “I guess these are coming back home with me,” Hill said of some of the prizes she brought for correct answers.
@ONA11 #diversitykey panel: @bkoon, @sammyd, Joel Dreyfus of @TheRoot247 & @LatoyaPeterson, moderated by @RethaHill. Amazing group!
NABJDigital
September 24, 2011
Above: Joel Dreyfuss, TheRoot.com and Bruce Koon, KQEDI, along with several other NABJ memebrs, were sitting in the front row of this Saturday morning keynote panel, whose members were Founder Joel Dreyfuss of TheRoot.com, LaToya Peterson of the Racialicious blog, along with Bruce Koon, news director at KQED and Sam Diaz, a Silicon Valley-based freelance writer, ghost writer and communications consultant.

Above: LaToya Peterson, Sam Diaz and Retha Hill.
joel.dreyfuss | The Root

Kweku Adoboli’s runaway losses leads to CEO Oswald Grübel’s departure. It wasn’t racial solidarity but racial vulnerability that made him so important to African Americans. The Rev. Raphael Warnock of Ebenezer Baptist Church says the case is in blatant contradiction to American ideals.
About | Latoya Peterson

A certified media junkie, Latoya Peterson provides a hip-hop feminist and anti-racist view on pop culture with a special focus on video games, anime, American comics, manga, magazines, film, television, and music.
Sam Diaz

Sam has been a professional journalist for more than 20 years, primarily in newspapers but more recently online. He has covered pretty much every facet of the tech industry over the past dozen years as a beat reporter/editor/blogger for the San Jose Mercury News, the Washington Post and ZDNet.

This has been going on, it seems, forever. But the latest round was spurred in December 2010 after News Foo was held at the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University.  Panel moderator Retha Hill, director of the new media innovation lab at ASU — who did
attend News Foo — offered more information.  And Hill asked the bigger question — why are new media conferences lacking in minorities?

News Foo Camp: Not fully open, but certainly not secret

I tweet a lot from journalism events. I think I can say that few people tweet as much about journalism as I do. I didn’t tweet much from News Foo Camp last weekend. But other campers and I tweeted enough that our tweeps wanted more.
News Foo Campers – NewsFoo10

Twitter account lists of all of the News Foo attendees: jdunck/newsfoo (113 as of Dec 8) mattBernius/foonews (49 as of Dec 8)
So now the panel begins with a pop quiz from Moderator Retha Hill.
“We’re talking about the old days, those old days… the 1990s.” @Retha_Hill #ona11 #key #diversitykey
Maddoxnelson
September 24, 2011
“We should know this history about what people of color are doing,” says #ONA11 #diversitykey moderator @Rethahill
NABJDigital
September 24, 2011
We just failed a pop quiz on diverse pioneers in minority digital media. Shame! I should have remembered Asian Ave. #ONA11 #diversitykey
ttr_the_engager
September 24, 2011
Minorities respond to @RethaHill: http://ow.ly/6DGuE Founded by @emmacarew: http://ow.ly/6DGuF #diversitykey #ONA11
NABJDigital
September 24, 2011
Amazing discussion on diversity in newsrooms. Minorities make up only 13% of US newsrooms, wonder what Can. stats are? #ona11 #diversitykey
LisaWhy
September 24, 2011
“People tend to hire people who are like them” says Joel Dreyfus of @TheRoot247 #diversitykey #ona11
lisalisle
September 24, 2011
Current speaker Joel Dreyfuss of @TheRoot247 is 1 of the original founders of #NABJ. #diversitykey #ona11
benetwilson
September 24, 2011
“At some point, it’s not about goodwill. What are the metrics to get us to that point?” says @bkoon. #diversitykey #ONA11
SuziSteffen
September 24, 2011
.@sammyd uses example of death of Celia Cruz on why diversity is needed in newsrooms. #ONA11 #diversitykey http://ow.ly/6DGSh
NABJDigital
September 24, 2011
Good panel about intentionally building diverse team. Need to think about it harder for iMA conf #diversitykey #ona11 #pubmedia
IntMediaAssn
September 24, 2011
Looking for diverse people for your conventions/workshops/panels? Go HERE: http://t.co/o3fhrBop #ONA11 #diversitykey
benetwilson
September 24, 2011
LOVING #diversitykey #ONA11. Things like this are exactly why I decided to run for board.
jmsummers
September 24, 2011
@kimbui Considering how the media cycle works, who “deserves” coverage is a tricky determination. Not a meritocracy. #ONA11 #diversitykey
racialicious
September 24, 2011
Online costs being lower means many more voices can be heard, says #NABJ co-founder Joel Dreyfus. #ona11 #diversitykey
theabug
September 24, 2011
Vast amount of money going to fund startups goes to white guys, says Joel Dreyfus, at race, gender, tech panel. #ONA11 #diversitykey
MaryNersessian
September 24, 2011
Joel Dreyfus speaks truth about how VCs give money out “to people who look like them from the same 3 or 4 schools.” #diversitykey #ONA11
SuziSteffen
September 24, 2011
I.e., @kimbui, the IFC Media Project did a piece on why “the media loves missing white girls.” http://t.co/I1BwKMjm #ONA11 #diversitykey
racialicious
September 24, 2011
.@LatoyaPeterson says audience for stories on @racialicious means “we have to completely disassemble our assumptions.” #diversitykey #ONA11
SuziSteffen
September 24, 2011
.@LatoyaPeterson gives great view on how @racialicious dealt w/London riots. #diversitykey #ONA11 http://ow.ly/6DH6x
NABJDigital
September 24, 2011
We’re all cracking up thanks to @LatoyaPeterson’s analysis of the BLACK WOMEN WILL NEVER MARRY BLAH BLAH BLAH articles. #diversitykey #ONA11
SuziSteffen
September 24, 2011
“What companies are committed to diversity now?” Quiet for a minute, then @LatoyaPeterson says @AJEnglish. #diversitykey #ONA11
SuziSteffen
September 24, 2011
@LatoyaPeterson: “Expanding the places for where you would look for talent.” On how to identify more diverse news staff #ONA11 #diversitykey
jmfbrooks
September 24, 2011
I’m bothered by forcing diversity. Don’t put a minority on the front page bc of who they are but bc they deserve it #ONA11 #diversitykey
kimbui
September 24, 2011
Bruce Koon: we (journalists) need to go out where the communities are to build audience #diversitykey #ONA11
webcurtpsu
September 24, 2011
Dori Maynard of Maynard Institute says a lack of emphasis on diversity makes news incomplete. #ona11 #diversitykey
theabug
September 24, 2011
.@djmaynard: People of color are rarely portrayed in “nuanced complexity” and “everydayness” #ONA11 #diversitykey
NABJDigital
September 24, 2011
.@djmaynard reports on study on minorities on the Web. http://ow.ly/6DH9c Who is Dori’s father? http://ow.ly/6DHb3 #ONA11 #diversitykey
benetwilson
September 24, 2011
FYI: @NiemanReports just had a story on Maynard online diversity audit http://t.co/6k6ume6A #ONA11 #diversitykey
JustinNXT
September 24, 2011
Dori Maynard: ‘We can”t be the country we want to be if our story is told by only one group of citizens. ‘ YES. #ona11 #diversitykey
LisaWhy
September 24, 2011
Proud and lucky to work in the uber diverse @stlbeacon newsroom. #ona11 #diversitykey
nicolehollway
September 24, 2011

NABJDigital Profiles Latoya Peterson, Owner And Editor Of Racialicious Blog

By Jeannine Hunter, News Producer, Washington Post

LaToya Peterson

NABJ Digital profiles freelance writer/blogger Latoya Peterson, the owner and editor of Racialicious , a collaborative blog about the intersection of race and pop culture.  This media junkie is a Poynter Institute Sensemaking Fellow and a Public Media Corps fellow. She has contributed to numerous publications and websites including: the Guardian Jezebel.com; Clutch, an online magazine; as well as TheRoot.com and Slate’s Double X. She has also contributed to books such as Yes Means Yes: Visions of Female Sexual Power and A World Without Rape () and Feminism FOR REAL: Deconstructing the academic industrial complex of feminism. She will also participate in the NABJ convention workshop “GOT GAME? A NEW DESIGN FOR INNOVATIVE JOURNALISM” on Saturday, Aug. 6 from 10:30 am to noon.

Peterson discussed the vision behind Racialicious and the challenges of maintaining and promoting it.

NABJDigital: Are you a Washingtonian or someone who relocated to this area and fell in love with it? 

LaToya Peterson: I grew up here.  My mom lived in Maryland and my Dad lived in D.C.  So I’m a local.  I don’t call myself a Washingtonian though – Washington is a different kind of place from D.C., and I learned that as I got older.

ND: What inspired the blog? How often is it updated and what are peak days/times when you and your colleague(s) encounter more traffic and news?

LP: Carmen Van Kerckhove (now Carmen Sognonvi) started this blog as Mixed Media Watch as a way to monitor representations of mixed race people and interracial couples in the media.  Her then-partner, Jen Chau, wanted to be more involved with her mixed race advocacy organization Swirl. Carmen had also wanted to bridge the gulf between larger conversations on race and mixed race issues, so she rolled them all into Racialicious.  I came on around the transition as a special correspondent and went from there.

I was attracted to the blog because it was a pan-racial take on events – it wasn’t just about black issues or Asian issues, but was welcoming to all.  As we’ve grown, it’s been a struggle to keep up as well and to learn about all the different communities we serve.  We’ve also been on a heavy learning curve since we have an international audience, and race issues change depending on how that society has constructed different groups.

We update daily, the goal is to do three posts a day, though that doesn’t always happen.  Heavy traffic days are mid-week, lightest on the weekend.  But our posts tend to have a long tail – so something we post Monday will still receive comments and debate on Friday.

ND: What sets Racialicious apart from other sites that addresses the complexities of all things racial (sexual/political and any other -ism warranting closer attention)?

LP: Three things – 1. We’re a multiracial space, which makes things infinitely more complicated.  Traditionally, race work has been silo-ed with most folks sticking to their own background group, and occasionally reaching out to white audiences.  Our goal is to get people talking to each other across racial, ethnic, and national boundaries.

2. We base everything in pop culture.  Most people (and most of us on staff) didn’t have the ability or luxury to spend a lot of time with critical race or oppression studies in school.  So pop culture becomes an easy way in to open up broader conversations.  I’m currently working on a piece about two shows – Single Ladies and Love Bites – to talk about the differences between how the shows present interracial relationships.  Love Bites, which is a show revolving around a handful of white characters, takes the colorblind approach, where race is never mentioned and is never an issue.  Single Ladies, which revolves around two black women and one white one (who dates black men) bring up race, but not in the heavy-handed way it’s often dealt with on other shows.  Pop culture helps people grasp onto these larger issues of theory in a way that makes sense to them.

3. We deal with structures.  We’re interested in the root cause of a lot of these problems and we want to discuss that with a wider audience that normally doesn’t get that kind of analysis from mainstream media sources.

ND: W hat are some challenges you face in gathering information and maintaining the blog?

LP: Time is the largest one.  Racialicious is a volunteer effort, so we are always out of time.  Information and such flows through to us at this point, far more than we can handle.  So our biggest challenges are increasing capacity and figuring out how some of us can transition into doing this full time.

ND: How does maintaining this effort differ from your other writing/journalism experience(s)?

LP: I started digitally, so to me digital writing is a lot more free than other types.  I’m not worrying about word counts or page limits, I don’t have an editor, I don’t have to worry about timeliness or arguing why something is relevant – we write what we like and what interests us.  I love the collective that we built – our commenter base is whip smart and informed and just as snarky as we are.

I like the people who helped make this happen – Carmen, Wendi, Arturo, Thea, Fatemeh, Nadra, Jessica and Andrea all came into this project knowing it was this weird kind of collaborative experiment, and yet stayed around anyway.  That’s what I love it about it.  Other writing is fun too.  It just never feels like home the way Racialicious does.