Monthly Archives: January 2012

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair & freelance aviation journalist/blogger

Webbmedia Group has a great mega calendar of events that catches things not covered below.  If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click here.  You can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box.)

2012

JANUARY

  • The Society of Professional Journalists is now taking applications for its Pulliam/Kilgore Freedom of Information Internships.  One intern works in the offices of the Society’s First Amendment legal counsel in Washington, D.C. The other intern works at the Society’s National Headquarters in Indianapolis.  The deadline to apply is Jan. 14.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding an online webinar, “Becoming a More Effective Reporter: Telling Untold Stories,” Jan. 17 through Feb. 11, 2011.  This course will help you improve your ability to find and tell stories off the beaten path. It will open your eyes and ears to story ideas buried in plain sight and show you how to mine communities, cultures and individuals for stories that often remain untold.  The cost is $399.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its Independent Journalists Workshop March 21-25.  The workshop will provide journalists with the hands-on training and tools to get started with an online publishing enterprise.  The deadline to apply is Jan. 28.

FEBRUARY

  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is offering a free webinar “Social Media 101, 202, 303,” Feb. 8-10.   Social Media 101 offers the basics for social media newbies.  Social Media 202 is tips for reporters about using social media sites as research tools. Social Media 303 will show how to filter to contain the clutter.

 MARCH

  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its 2011 Multimedia Training Jan. 9-14 and May 15-20. The workshop offers intensive training that covers all aspects of multimedia news production; from basic storyboarding to hands-on instruction with hardware and software for production of multimedia stories. Participants will be organized into teams to report on a pre-arranged story in the Bay Area, and then construct a multimedia presentation based on that coverage.  Applications are due by March 18 for the May training.

APRIL

  • The International Reporting Project is accepting applications for its  fall 2011 fellowships. The fellowships allow U.S. journalists to do original, in-depth reporting projects overseas covering neglected, “under-reported” stories of global importance.  The deadline for the fall application is April 1.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its Web 2.0 workshop Feb. 14-18 and June 13-17.  This training takes participants through the progression of reporting news for multiple digital platforms, starting with quick text posts and moving through photos and video and finally ending with a full multimedia presentation. The workshop provides hands-on training using Twitter and Facebook for reporting and driving web traffic, creating data-driven map mashups, dynamically updating a blog for breaking news, publishing photo galleries and audio slideshows, producing videos and editing videos using Final Cut Pro.  The deadline to apply is April 15 for the June training.
  • The National Conference for Media Reform will hold its annual conference in Boston April 8-11, 2011.  The conference brings together thousands of activists, media makers, educators, journalists, scholars, policymakers and engaged citizens to meet, tell their stories, share tactics, listen to great speakers and build the movement for better media in America.

If you have any items that I’ve missed, please drop me an email via the DJTF Yahoo! Listserv or at benet AT aviationqueen DOT com.  Thanks!

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair & freelance aviation journalist/blogger

Webbmedia Group has a great mega calendar of events that catches things not covered below.  If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click hereYou can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box.)

JANUARY

  • The Society of Professional Journalists is now taking applications for its Pulliam/Kilgore Freedom of Information Internships.  One intern works in the offices of the Society’s First Amendment legal counsel in Washington, D.C. The other intern works at the Society’s National Headquarters in Indianapolis.  The deadline to apply is Jan. 14.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding an online webinar, “Becoming a More Effective Reporter: Telling Untold Stories,” Jan. 17 through Feb. 11, 2011.  This course will help you improve your ability to find and tell stories off the beaten path. It will open your eyes and ears to story ideas buried in plain sight and show you how to mine communities, cultures and individuals for stories that often remain untold.  The cost is $399.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its Independent Journalists Workshop March 21-25.  The workshop will provide journalists with the hands-on training and tools to get started with an online publishing enterprise.  The deadline to apply is Jan. 28.

  FEBRUARY

  • Webbmedia Group is partnering with the National Press Club for a workshop, “10 Tech Trends for Q1,” Feb. 2 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (ET) in Washington, D.C.  Learn about the most interesting emerging technologies coming to market in the next few months that stand to impact your work. This invigorating session will showcase ten tech trends that you need to know now. We’ll explain what they are in plain English, why they matter to you and how you can leverage them to energize your work. The cost is $50, and $25 for press club members.  And check out this Storify of a presentation Amy Webb gave on this topic at NABJ’s 2011 annual conference.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is offering a free webinar “Social Media 101, 202, 303,” Feb. 8-10.   Social Media 101 offers the basics for social media newbies.  Social Media 202 is tips for reporters about using social media sites as research tools. Social Media 303 will show how to filter to contain the clutter.
  • Webbmedia Group is partnering with the National Press Club for a workshop, “How To Write a Social Media Policy,” Jan. 19 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (ET) in Washington, D.C. The session will discuss the basic structure of a social media policy, and talk through best practices with a lawyer who specializes in new media. In the second half of this session, small groups will work to create social media policies for your organization. Each attendee will receive a template and workbook to take back to their organizations.  The cost is $150, and $125 for press club members.

MARCH

  • Polish your skills in computer-assisted reporting (CAR) and learn how to hold local businesses accountable with this free, daylong workshop co-presented by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and Investigative Reporters and Editors, March 15.  This free workshop precedes the Society of American Business Editors and Writers Conference March 15-17, for which there is an additional fee.  Click here to register for the free workshop.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its 2011 Multimedia Training Jan. 9-14 and May 15-20. The workshop offers intensive training that covers all aspects of multimedia news production; from basic storyboarding to hands-on instruction with hardware and software for production of multimedia stories. Participants will be organized into teams to report on a pre-arranged story in the Bay Area, and then construct a multimedia presentation based on that coverage.  Applications are due by March 18 for the May training.

APRIL

  • The International Reporting Project is accepting applications for its spring and fall 2011 fellowships. The fellowships allow U.S. journalists to do original, in-depth reporting projects overseas covering neglected, “under-reported” stories of global importance.  The deadline for the fall application is April 1.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its Web 2.0 workshop Feb. 14-18 and June 13-17.  This training takes participants through the progression of reporting news for multiple digital platforms, starting with quick text posts and moving through photos and video and finally ending with a full multimedia presentation. The workshop provides hands-on training using Twitter and Facebook for reporting and driving web traffic, creating data-driven map mashups, dynamically updating a blog for breaking news, publishing photo galleries and audio slideshows, producing videos and editing videos using Final Cut Pro.  The deadline to apply is April 15 for the June training.
  • The National Conference for Media Reform will hold its annual conference in Boston April 8-11, 2011.  The conference brings together thousands of activists, media makers, educators, journalists, scholars, policymakers and engaged citizens to meet, tell their stories, share tactics, listen to great speakers and build the movement for better media in America.

If you have any items that I’ve missed, please drop me an email via the DJTF Yahoo! Listserv or at benet AT aviationqueen DOT com.  Thanks!

Friday Fast Five

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair & freelance aviation journalist/blogger

First, I want to wish you all a happy new year.  One of my resolutions for 2012 (besides getting my pilot license) is to get this blog back on track.  That means more posts from more guest bloggers, along with keeping up with regular features like our Calendar, which comes out every Monday, and this column every Friday.  Enjoy!

  1. 10000 Words: 3 Things Journalists Can Teach Themselves Over Vacation (OK, this was for the recent Christmas holiday, but it’s relevant year round)
  2. American Express Open ForumHow To Start Managing Your Online Reputation
  3. BaltTech blog: Hey Google: Let 410Labs show you how to launch an email app
  4. Brazen Life: 4 Things You Can Learn for Free (or Cheap) to Help You Land Your Next Job
  5. IJNet: Top five multimedia tools for journalists of 2011

What Journalists Should Know About SOPA

I recently put that Georgetown Law Degree and my journalism experience to good use by explaining complicated federal copyright legislation that the U.S. Congress is currently debating in Washington, D.C. to readers of Poynter Online.

It got me to thinking: Shouldn’t the National Association of Black Journalists also weigh-in on this fight. After all, it is our members who are disproportionately getting laid off from news organizations each and every day. Thus, it is our members who are turning in greater and greater numbers to launching their own websites and blogs. But even if they aren’t freelancing or starting their own businesses, our members still need to know how these bills can help or hinder them.

To that extent, I am posting the link to the piece I wrote for Poynter here. In a nutshell, journalists are worried about having their words being stolen, whether by those who engage in ‘over-aggregation’ or outright copyists. But we also want to ensure the free flow of information.

So what do you think? Where should NABJ come down on this issue, or should the organization keep quiet?

Tracie Powell is Vice Chair of NABJ’s Digital Journalism Task Force, a recent graduate of Georgetown University Law Center and writes about technology and media policy.

LinkedIn Unveils Most-used Profile Buzz Words in 2011

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF chair & freelance aviation journalist/blogger

In those rare hours where I have some time to myself, I do free resume reviews for students and young journalists.  I had people help me with this and other things when I started in the business, and I feel an obligation to return the favor.

Professional social media platform LinkedIn recently came out with its list of the top 10 most-used buzz words in members’ profiles during 2011.  You can see the list here.  But there are words that just drive me (and potential employers) nuts when they come up in a resume.  I list them below, and why they drive us crazy.

  • Communication skills:  If you’re a journalist, this should be a given, so you don’t need to actually spell it out on the resume;
  • Objective: I hate this word, because the resume itself tells an employer that your objective is to get a job.  Get rid of this word and the chatter that usually follows it and use that valuable resume space to show how you can actually help an employer with your skills;
  • Organized/organizational: journalists by their very nature have to be organized, so there’s no need to state the obvious. Instead, highlight things you’ve done that show off your organizational skills;
  • Track record: the first thing that pops into my head when I see this is “track and field star?” Instead of saying you have a track record, illustrate it with your body of work;
  • Motivated: if you’re looking for a job, it’s obvious that you’re motivated to get hired.  Otherwise, why would you send the resume in the first place? Instead, highlight projects and skills that show initiative and/or creative thinking;
  • Out-of-the-box/innovative: One, these phrases are way overused. Two, people use bad examples to illustrate this.  So show, don’t tell about how your skills are out-of-the-box or innovative; and
  • Effective: No one will describe themselves as ineffective, especially on a resume.  Again, show, don’t tell, how you and your skills would be effective in the workplace.

 

Happy New Year with New Tech Tools

By Sylvia Franklin
 
It’s a new year, and that probably means new demands on your already overscheduled life. Here are a few tech tools that, hopefully, will make things a bit easier.
 
DocScanner works across iOS, Android and Symbian platforms. Just take a photo of a document, receipt or notebook page and email it as a PDF. Integrate with Mobile.me, Dropbox or Evernote.  Full disclosure, a few bugs were discovered in the previous version.  The fixes were recently released here — docscannerapp.com/2011/04/02/docscanner-iphone-5-0-1-released/
 
CardMunch, Free 
Like you, I get a ton of business cards. Problem is, what to do with them on-the-go? A possible solution — CardMunch. Use this app to scan business cards, then add them as contacts in your phone and connect with them on LinkedIn.
 
Ever get tired of registering for an event, then losing the paper ticket and registration details weeks later? Eventbrite launched its first attendee app a couple of weeks ago. You can use it to buy Eventbrite tickets and then present your ticket barcode for scanning at the door. Finally! Keeps you organized, and greener.
 
Carrying cash is so 2011. Square works by combining a small, square-shaped card reader with a free app for iPhone and Android. Plug the reader into the microphone jack of your smartphone and open the app. Transactions can be processed either by swiping the card or hand-keying the digits.
Square charges a 2.75% transaction fee but has no other associated costs. It’s great for entrepreneurs and small business in that it eliminates the need for expensive point-of-sale systems.  It’s also portable and can be used with any Android or iOS device.
 
Feeling a little anti-Mac, but loving the iPhone’s personal assistant Siri, and its voice-activated capability? Here’s an alternative – Vlingo. It does more than just take voice commands to make calls, SMS, emails, search the web, or get directions. Vlingo also interfaces with your Twitter and Facebook accounts to let you update with your voice. And it does so without workarounds. For example, if you wanted to tweet, but couldn’t because Twitter only recognizes you by your phone number instead of your user name, and the only way around it is to use your phone number and other Byzantine rules. Complicated? Yes, but not Vlingo.
 
Happy New year, happy tech tools!
 
Equal parts digital storyteller and strategist, Sylvia Franklin prefers a multiplatform approach when telling and sharing stories.