Posted in Awards, Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism, Webinars

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

Webbmedia Group has a great calendar of events that catches things not covered below.  If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click here. You can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box.)

The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute has updated its calendar of free workshops and webinars from now through May 2011.  And Media Bistro has its current course list available through the end of March.

FEBRUARY

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is hosting a live chat with Marcia Parker, West Coast editorial director for AOL’s hyperlocal news venture, Patch.com.  The chat will be held Feb. 14 from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. EST.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, 100 Ideas to Make Your Journalism Better, Feb. 16 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  This unique Webinar will help you add more tools to your bag of strategies and approach your craft with new enthusiasm. And you’ll get great ideas to pass around to friends, colleagues and even family.  The cost is $24.95.
  • Seattle-based Creative Live is holding a free five-week course, Introduction to Final Cut Pro for DSLR Video, Feb. 16. Here is a perfect 5-week introduction to Final Cut Pro for photographers shooting video on DSLR cameras.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is partnering with the Investigative Reporters and Editors and the N.C. Press Association on a free Webinar, “Investigating Private Companies and Nonprofits,” in Raleigh, N.C.,  Feb. 23.  This Webinar help attendees find public documents on private companies and the basics of what you’ll find in those documents; understand the new Form 990 and the basics of nonprofits’ finances; and analyze and apply what you’ve learned — including discovering the power of spreadsheets to spot trends — to produce great stories.
  • The Freedom Forum Diversity Institute will hold its Multimedia Boot Camp for Journalism Professionals and Educators Feb. 23-27 at the John Seigenthaler Center in Nashville, Tenn. Participants will learn how to: produce multimedia on a budget, buy the right gear and find cheap ways to record and edit audio; use basic tools in Adobe Photoshop; edit an audio story with Audacity; produce an audio slideshow in Final Cut; produce two video projects, using Final Cut for storytelling and editing; and learn how smart phones can be used to gather news.  Tuition is $850.
  • Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE), in partnership with Hacks/Hackers, will offer hands-on data visualization training at NewsCamp on Feb. 24 in Raleigh, N.C.  Registration is $100.

MARCH

  • The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press has opened up applications for its Journalism Fellowship for 2011-2012.  The Journalism Fellow will be responsible for ensuring that our publications are appealing to and understandable by our core readers — journalists who do not have any special legal knowledge. The fellow will serve as the primary editor of our single-topic guides and our daily news product, making sure the web site is updated regularly.  Applications are due March 1.
  • The We Media PitchIt Challenge is a seed-stage investment competition that offers a $25,000 sponsorship and expert advice to help each of two winners turn their bold ideas into something real. The PitchIt challenge serves as a laboratory, classroom, showcase, incubator and forum for ideas shaping our connected society through innovative uses of media, communication and technology.  Applications are due March 1.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, Understanding Internet Basics for a Better Online News Operation, March 2 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  This Webinar will introduce technical terms and concepts such as Web addresses and protocols, which will help you solve problems and give you new confidence when talking with your technical team.  The cost is $27.95.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Covering the Green Economy – A Western Perspective,” in Los Angeles March 4.  The daylong workshop will help you learn the latest sustainable trends impacting your local economy and will give you practical tips for navigating one of the hottest topics around.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, Short Narrative Bursts: Social Media Writing, March 9 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  This Webinar will help you apply traditional writing strategies to social media platforms. The cost is $29.95.
  • Join Digital Journalism Task Force Treasurer Melanie Eversley of USA Today for a free webinar: “Some Multimedia With That Story?” This 90-minute webinar will take place Friday, March 11 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. EST.  Three panelists will discuss mapping out a story from conception, reaching out to other parts of the newsroom and brainstorming ways that social media, video, reader interaction and other tools can help bring new and eye-opening dimensions to your work.  Click here to register.
  • The International Reporting Project announces a two-week Gatekeeper Editors Trip to Indonesia on May 6-20, 2011, for senior U.S. editors and producers interested in learning more about this important country in Asia. Applications forms for this trip must be received by the IRP by March 11, 2011.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free live chat with Bloomberg’s John Gittelsohn on real estate March 16 at 1:30 p.m. EST.  He will discuss key housing trends to track locally.
  • The Conference on International News, Technology and Audiences will be held March 17-18 at the University of California-Berkeley.  The conference will bring together a broad range of academics, journalists and industry representatives in order to focus on some of the emergent, boundary-crossing constellations of news, technologies and audiences.  Registration is $250.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its 2011 Multimedia Training May 15-20. The workshop offers intensive training that covers all aspects of multimedia news production; from basic storyboarding to hands-on instruction with hardware and software for production of multimedia stories. Participants will be organized into teams to report on a pre-arranged story in the Bay Area, and then construct a multimedia presentation based on that coverage.  Applications are due by March 18.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “15 Red Flags When Editing Business Stories: Online,” March 29 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EST. This free Webinar aims to bring business copy into your comfort zone — or at least closer to it — by exposing the biggest pitfalls editors and reporters face in dealing with business topics.

APRIL

  • The Online News Association and the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute are co-sponsoring a one-day workshop — The Mobile Migration — at the John Seigenthaler Center on the campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville that will share real world information about delivering news and information for the small screen.  The event will be held April 1.  The cost is $50, with discounts for ONA members and students.
  • The Institute for Interactive Journalism and the McCormick Foundation are seeking to fund four women-led projects that will rock the world of journalism.  The McCormick Foundation’s New Media Women Entrepreneurs program will fund individuals who have original ideas to create new Web sites, mobile news services or other entrepreneurial initiatives that offer interactive opportunities to engage, inspire and improve news and information in a geographic community or a community of interest.  Applications are due April 4.  Check out NABJDigital’s profiles of winners Dr. Michelle Ferrier and Retha Hill.
  • The National Conference for Media Reform will hold its annual conference in Boston April 8-11, 2011.  The conference brings together thousands of activists, media makers, educators, journalists, scholars, policymakers and engaged citizens to meet, tell their stories, share tactics, listen to great speakers and build the movement for better media in America.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Telling Business Stories with Soundslides” at Southern Methodist University’s Umphrey Lee Center in Dallas, April 8. Attendees must be registered for the Society of American Business Writers and Editors spring conference April 7-9.
  • March 3 is the deadline to apply for the 16th annual Minority Writers Seminar to be held April 14-17 at the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.  Experienced minority journalists receive intense training for writing opinion in a “boot camp” environment.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Covering the green economy – Follow the green money,” April 19 at noon or 4:00 p.m. Eastern time.  You will learn the skills to find the green money trail on your beat. He’ll show you how to track green stimulus projects and identify the other cash trickling from Washington into your backyard.

MAY

  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “15 tips on time management for business journalists,” May 3.  Participants will learn simple things they can immediately incorporate into their daily work and personal lives that will allow them to juggle more efficiently. You can attend the hour-long, interactive session at either noon or 4 p.m. EDT on May 3.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Beyond Google: Mining the Web for company intelligence: Online,” May 17-18 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EST.  Here’s a chance to learn the tools and techniques that competitive intelligence experts use every day — and that you can use to keep tabs on the companies on your beat.

 

JUNE

  • Internet Week New York City is being held June 6-13.  Internet Week is a week-long festival of events celebrating New York’s thriving internet industry and community.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its Web 2.0 workshop June 13-17.  This training takes participants through the progression of reporting news for multiple digital platforms, starting with quick text posts and moving through photos and video and finally ending with a full multimedia presentation. The workshop provides hands-on training using Twitter and Facebook for reporting and driving web traffic, creating data-driven map mashups, dynamically updating a blog for breaking news, publishing photo galleries and audio slideshows, producing videos and editing videos using Final Cut Pro.  The deadline to apply is April 15.
  • The #140conf: NYC – Exploring “The State of NOW” will be held June 15-16 at the 92nd Street Y.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “10 Tips for Turning National Stories into Great Local Ones,” June 21 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EDT.  Listeners will learn how to localize hot national stories.

 

JULY

  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Unlocking Financial Statements,” July 18-22.  The weeklong online seminar covers income statements, balance sheets, cash flows and writing about numbers.

 

AUGUST

  • The National Association of Black Journalists is holding its annual convention and career fair Aug. 3-7, 2011, in Philadelphia.  Professional journalists, students and educators will take part in full- and half-day seminars designed to strengthen and enhance their skills. Workshops throughout the five-day convention will highlight journalism ethics, entrepreneurship, specialized journalism and transitioning journalism skills to book publishing, screen writing and media relations.

If you have any items that I’ve missed, please drop me an email via the DJTF Yahoo! Listserv or at regaviationqueen AT yahoo DOT com.  Thanks!

Posted in Education, journalism, multimedia journalist, Webinar

Friday Fast Five

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

Editor’s note: join Digital Journalism Task Force Treasurer Melanie Eversley of USA Today for a free webinar: “Some Multimedia With That Story?”  This 90-minute webinar will take place Friday, March 11 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. EST.  Three panelists will discuss mapping out a story from conception, reaching out to other parts of the newsroom and brainstorming ways that social media, video, reader interaction and other tools can help bring new and eye-opening dimensions to your work.  Click here to register.

  1. 10000 Words6 innovative uses of Tumblr by newsrooms
  2. NetworkedHarness the resources of the Web
  3. VimeoWelcome to Vimeo Video School
  4. Poynter6 ways journalists can use Quora as tool to report, share ideas
  5. GigaOmQR Codes 101: Make Links to Your Website from Anywhere (note: Knowlegewebb members can watch a webinar and access notes to a Lunchtime Boot Camp held yesterday on QR Codes here)
Posted in Entrepreneur, Innovation, journalism, multimedia journalist

Help Create The Black History Augmented Reality App

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

Retha Hill

NABJ member Retha Hill needs your help.  Last June, she was among four women who won a $12,000 grant from the McCormick New Media Women Entrepreneurs initiative to fund ideas.

Hill, currently director of the New Media Innovation Lab at Arizona State University, received funding for her Black History Augmented Reality app, which will layer data over real life at historical spots in six cities: Atlanta; Chicago; Detroit; Birmingham; Harlem; and the rest of Manhattan.  “Imagine pointing your mobile phone at a Washington, D.C., landmark and reading about its relevance in African-American history,” she wrote in her grant proposal.

But now Hill needs help to make her proposal a reality.  She’s looking for people who can provide content for the app.  She also needs at least 50 originally written records for each city, and she is paying people for their help.  She needs at least 40 records for smaller cities and 50+ for the larger ones.  She’s on a tight deadline, so she needs records by the end of February.

Each entry has to have:

  • Name
  • Short description
  • Latitude and Longitude (this is critical because all items have to have a corresponding geo-point). It is easy, just put in an address or intersection and city, state name into this map and copy the geocoordinates into the spreadsheet: http://itouchmap.com/latlong.html
  • Longer description
  • Wikimedia Commons or other Commons licensing art if applicable and photo name (plus a zip file of all the photos downloaded)
  • YouTube video if applicable (ex: Mahalia Jackson performing at a funeral or Bojangles Robinson dancing)

See what a sample entry looks like, below.  For more information, please contact Hill at hill.retha@gmail.com.

Posted in Education, Innovation, journalism, multimedia journalist, Social Media, Technology

NABJ DJTF Hosts Multimedia Webinar in March

By Melanie Eversley

DJTF, USA Today

Some dynamic journalists from Media General, Gannett and Time.com will be on hand virtually next month to help you sharpen your multimedia skills and brainstorm new and dynamic ways of telling stories.

“Some Multimedia With That Story?” is a 90-minute webinar being organized by NABJ’s Digital Journalism Task Force. It will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET on Friday, March 11, and is free and open to all. Links for registration are at the bottom of this post.

Smith

Panelist Nichelle Smith, custom content editor of Gannett’s ContentOne and editor/site manager of Gannett’s civil rights project, will share ways she’s used technology to preserve and share important parts of the Civil Rights Movement.

Smith also will discuss how she’s consulted with specialists in other parts of her newsroom to help her figure out ways to better get the word out about hard-hitting stories and projects.

Priyanka

Panelist Vidisha Priyanka, audience editor, staff and skills training for the Tampa Tribune, TBO.com and WFLA News Channel 8 will share the special checklist she has created for journalists to consult before they head out to report a story. Along with working for Media General, Priyanka also is an instructor for the Poynter Institute.

Gray

Panelist Madison Gray, homepage producer/writer for Time.com and blogger/contributor for BlackVoices.com, will discuss some of the outside-the-box projects he’s put together  for Time.com that have incorporated podcasts, video and written pieces. Gray also will share his tips for getting your skills up to speed in the digital newsroom.

Discussion will include mapping out the story from conception, reaching out to other parts of the newsroom and brainstorming ways that social media, video, reader interaction and other tools can help bring new and eye-opening dimensions to your work.

To register, click here.

See you then.

Posted in Equipment, Innovation, Technology

High Quality TVs Without High Quality TV Signals

By Andrew Humphrey, CBM
Founder & Co-Chair, NABJ’s Digital Journalism Task Force
Meteorologist & Station Scientist, WDIV-TV | ClickOnDetroit.com

When investing in a new high-definition television (HDTV), it is not only important to research brands for the latest and greatest features but also research your available channels to make sure they transmit the latest and greatest signal. Many modern tubes are ready to receive the best transmissions, but most media companies do not crank them out.

One family recently purchased a flat-screen HDTV for the first time. The main features they needed were long-lasting high picture quality and sound. They decided on an LED set with 1080p resolution, which is widely considered to be the best, most enduring technology with the best picture quality when compared to plasma and LCD sets.

A second picture quality feature is motion rate. Motion rate is the frequency at which individual video frames are captured and displayed to HDTV viewers. 60 Hz, 120 Hz and 240 Hz motion rates are some common examples in the marketplace. The higher the number, the crisper and less blurry fast actions like sports, fight scenes, car chases and animals running appear.

This particular family’s HDTV has a 120 Hz motion rate. With more and more news, weather, sports and entertainment being shot in or converted to 1080p resolution (or at least 720p), picture quality was not an issue. A 1080p show can be seen at 1080p resolution, and their television displayed the 1080p signal they were receiving when they hooked up their TV set.

However, their TV also told them they were watching programs at 60 Hz motion rate, not the 120 Hz it was capable of and only half of its potential. It may seem like a trivial difference because the picture is still visible. To an extent this is true, but many recall the emergence of HDTV being the wave of the future. At first, when it was just talk, many critics railed against the technology by highlighting the then exorbitant price of the first HDTV sets in the five-figures range. Opponents pointed to the then bulky box sets (cathode ray televisions, CRTs) and said they show a picture that is just fine and did not see the big deal about high def. Then when the public got to view and experience the eye-popping difference, seeing was believing, and HDTVs eventually sold like hotcakes. Now, just like mobile phones and computers, many cannot imagine living without them so they can look for the tiniest wrinkles on their favorite reporter’s face or leftover lint on their favorite anchor’s suit.

In addition to perceiving the seemingly unperceivable, there is the noticeable impact on the pocketbook. Doubling the motion rate once or twice can increase the price by a few hundred to a thousand bucks. So this family’s frustrations are compounded when they learned that they cannot max out all features of their “wave of the future” set and may have paid hundreds of dollars more than they needed, and it was all out of their hands.

So who’s hands was their situation in? As cable subscribers, they thought the cable company had control over the content pushed to them through their cable wire. When the family called the company, a representative named “Eric” was on the line but did not have the answer the family wanted. Eric informed them that the cable company was not in control and that each individual channel (from their local broadcaster to HBO) is in charge of transmitting its programs at the motion rate the channel desires, and currently “most stations send their signal out at 60 Hz.”  For the family, calling over 500 channels seems out of the question, so until TV stations upgrade their signals, the family is stuck and out of luck (including some cash).

We are living in an age where the equipment audiences use to watch and hear their favorite show outpaces that of the media company providing programming. Thus, many current and future consumers will shell out more dollars and be more advanced, but will have to wait for cable and satellite companies to catch up. This means they will waste their hard-earned money and pay their service provider more money to boot. And if they do their research to buy a telly that matches the output it will receive, they risk the new obsolescence cycle where the item they spent a month’s salary or more on for what they believe is the biggest and baddest on the block quickly seems like the meekest and weakest within a few months.

There may not be a win-win solution now, but there can be one on the horizon where viewers and corporations adapt and adjust their respective technologies with modernization so everyone feels they have spent their money and time wisely. If this happens, all familes can gather around the television and feel satisfied.

Posted in Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism, multimedia journalist

Picking And Choosing The Right Conferences

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

I recently did an interview with an industry social media type, and she asked me what conferences do I attend.  We both laughed that between journalism, “new” media, communications and social media, one could attend something every day of the week.  The fortunate thing is that time constraints and money make us all choose very carefully.

 

A session at NABJ's 2010 conference Photo by Benet J. Wilson

My two must attend conferences are the National Association of Black Journalists and the Online News Association.  I feel that these are two that help me the most in making sure I’m still vital to my newsroom.  And I am able to cite examples of how NABJ has done just that since I started attending the annual convention in 2006.

 

But after that, where do you go?  Others on my list include SXSW Interactive, March 11-15; The National Conference for Media Reform, April 8-11;  BlogWorld & New Media Expo; the Society of American Business Writers and Editors spring conference April 7-9; Blog Her; Internet Week New York City, June 6-13; Blogalicious; DC Week 2011; and Blogging While Brown, among others.

And then there are the  various trainings, webinars, one-day conferences and workshops that pop up all year.  And then I learn about the inaugural Mashable Connect 2011 conference on my Google Reader.  It’s described as:

Mashable Connect 2011 will be an intimate experience that brings together leaders from the digital world for a weekend away to share and connect offline. Set away from the distractions of traditional conferences, Mashable Connect will recreate the Mashable web experience on the grounds of Disney World, creating an environment where attendees can truly engage and build lasting connections.

I am a big fan of Mashable, and they are a must-read for me.  I attended their summer tour event in July when they came to USA Today’s headquarters, and it was a great networking event.  This one, scheduled for May 12-14 in Orlando promises to be even better.  They are currently taking applications for 300 spots.  I want to be one of those 300, not only because it promises to be a fascinating event, but I’m betting there won’t be a lot of diversity at the event.

I commend Mashable for opening up the application process, and I know they will have people beating down the door to attend.  As much as I’d love to be there, I know I’ll have to pass.  I just don’t have a spare $2,500 lying around to be there.  This does include 3 nights of hotel accommodations at Disney’s Contemporary Resort, all meals, full conference access including conversations with speakers, special activities and networking events, plus a few surprises. I know I’ll kick myself for not attending, but it’s all about priorities.

So here’s my question to you – what are your must-attend conferences? What are some that you’d like to attend if you won that $63 million Power Ball ticket?  How do you save your pennies to attend the conferences that are tops on your list? Tell us in the comments section. Thanks!

Posted in Awards, Conferences & Conventions, Education, journalism, multimedia journalist

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

Webbmedia Group has a great calendar of events that catches things not covered below.  If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click here. You can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box.)

The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute has updated its calendar of free workshops and webinars from now through May 2011.  And Media Bistro has its current course list available through the end of March.

FEBRUARY

  • Seattle-based Creative Live is holding a free course, Website Makeover, Feb. 8. In this unique course, Erik Fadiman walks us through a complete website makeover for a local non-profit organization.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is offering a free webinar “Social Media 101, 202, 303,” Feb. 8-10.   Social Media 101 offers the basics for social media newbies.  Social Media 202 is tips for reporters about using social media sites as research tools. Social Media 303 will show how to filter to contain the clutter.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, Write with Voice and Tone: Poynter Writing Webinar Series, Feb. 9 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  Memorable writing has a strong voice and appropriate tone. Whether you are writing Twitter updates, a blog or a long narrative, you want to hit the right chord when it comes to tone and voice. This will distinguish your writing from others and connect with your audience.  The cost is $29.95.
  • The S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University is taking submissions for the 2011 Mirror Awards.  Categories include: Best Single Article, Traditional Media; Best Single Article, Digital Media; Best Profile, Traditional Media; Best Profile, Digital Media; Best Commentary, Traditional Media; Best Commentary, Digital Media (including blogs); and Best In-Depth Piece, Traditional Media. Submissions cover work done in 2010; the deadline to submit is Feb. 10.
  • The Knight Community Information Challenge is now taking applications.  If you have a question about the Challenge, participate in an online chat, where Knight staff will answer questions, at 4 p.m. Feb. 10. The Knight Community Information Challenge is a five-year, $24 million initiative to help community and  place-based foundations to play leading roles in meeting the information needs of their communities.
  • Seattle-based Creative Live is holding a free four-week course, DSLR Fast Start Workshop Series, on Thursdays starting Feb. 10. Cameras covered include: Canon Rebel T2i / 550D; Nikon D3100; Canon 60D; and Nikon D7000.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is hosting a live chat with Marcia Parker, West Coast editorial director for AOL’s hyperlocal news venture, Patch.com.  The chat will be held Feb. 14 from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. EST.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, 100 Ideas to Make Your Journalism Better, Feb. 16 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  This unique Webinar will help you add more tools to your bag of strategies and approach your craft with new enthusiasm. And you’ll get great ideas to pass around to friends, colleagues and even family.  The cost is $24.95.
  • Seattle-based Creative Live is holding a free five-week course, Introduction to Final Cut Pro for DSLR Video, Feb. 16. Here is a perfect 5-week introduction to Final Cut Pro for photographers shooting video on DSLR cameras.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is partnering with the Investigative Reporters and Editors and the N.C. Press Association on a free Webinar, “Investigating Private Companies and Nonprofits,” in Raleigh, N.C.,  Feb. 23.  This Webinar help attendees find public documents on private companies and the basics of what you’ll find in those documents; understand the new Form 990 and the basics of nonprofits’ finances; and analyze and apply what you’ve learned — including discovering the power of spreadsheets to spot trends — to produce great stories.
  • The Freedom Forum Diversity Institute will hold its Multimedia Boot Camp for Journalism Professionals and Educators Feb. 23-27 at the John Seigenthaler Center in Nashville, Tenn. Participants will learn how to: produce multimedia on a budget, buy the right gear and find cheap ways to record and edit audio; use basic tools in Adobe Photoshop; edit an audio story with Audacity; produce an audio slideshow in Final Cut; produce two video projects, using Final Cut for storytelling and editing; and learn how smart phones can be used to gather news.  Tuition is $850.
  • Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE), in partnership with Hacks/Hackers, will offer hands-on data visualization training at NewsCamp on Feb. 24 in Raleigh, N.C.  Registration is $100.

MARCH

  • The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press has opened up applications for its Journalism Fellowship for 2011-2012.  The Journalism Fellow will be responsible for ensuring that our publications are appealing to and understandable by our core readers — journalists who do not have any special legal knowledge. The fellow will serve as the primary editor of our single-topic guides and our daily news product, making sure the web site is updated regularly.  Applications are due March 1.
  • The We Media PitchIt Challenge is a seed-stage investment competition that offers a $25,000 sponsorship and expert advice to help each of two winners turn their bold ideas into something real. The PitchIt challenge serves as a laboratory, classroom, showcase, incubator and forum for ideas shaping our connected society through innovative uses of media, communication and technology.  Applications are due March 1.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, Understanding Internet Basics for a Better Online News Operation, March 2 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  This Webinar will introduce technical terms and concepts such as Web addresses and protocols, which will help you solve problems and give you new confidence when talking with your technical team.  The cost is $27.95.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Covering the Green Economy – A Western Perspective,” in Los Angeles March 4.  The daylong workshop will help you learn the latest sustainable trends impacting your local economy and will give you practical tips for navigating one of the hottest topics around.
  • The Poynter Institute is holding a webinar, Short Narrative Bursts: Social Media Writing, March 9 at 2:00 p.m. EST.  This Webinar will help you apply traditional writing strategies to social media platforms. The cost is $29.95.
  • The International Reporting Project announces a two-week Gatekeeper Editors Trip to Indonesia on May 6-20, 2011, for senior U.S. editors and producers interested in learning more about this important country in Asia. Applications forms for this trip must be received by the IRP by March 11, 2011.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free live chat with Bloomberg’s John Gittelsohn on real estate March 16 at 1:30 p.m. EST.  He will discuss key housing trends to track locally.
  • The Conference on International News, Technology and Audiences will be held March 17-18 at the University of California-Berkeley.  The conference will bring together a broad range of academics, journalists and industry representatives in order to focus on some of the emergent, boundary-crossing constellations of news, technologies and audiences.  Registration is $250.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its 2011 Multimedia Training May 15-20. The workshop offers intensive training that covers all aspects of multimedia news production; from basic storyboarding to hands-on instruction with hardware and software for production of multimedia stories. Participants will be organized into teams to report on a pre-arranged story in the Bay Area, and then construct a multimedia presentation based on that coverage.  Applications are due by March 18.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “15 Red Flags When Editing Business Stories: Online,” March 29 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EST. This free Webinar aims to bring business copy into your comfort zone — or at least closer to it — by exposing the biggest pitfalls editors and reporters face in dealing with business topics.

APRIL

  • The Online News Association and the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute are co-sponsoring a one-day workshop — The Mobile Migration — at the John Seigenthaler Center on the campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville that will share real world information about delivering news and information for the small screen.  The event will be held April 1.  The cost is $50, with discounts for ONA members and students.
  • The Institute for Interactive Journalism and the McCormick Foundation are seeking to fund four women-led projects that will rock the world of journalism.  The McCormick Foundation’s New Media Women Entrepreneurs program will fund individuals who have original ideas to create new Web sites, mobile news services or other entrepreneurial initiatives that offer interactive opportunities to engage, inspire and improve news and information in a geographic community or a community of interest.  Applications are due April 4.  Check out NABJDigital’s profiles of winners Dr. Michelle Ferrier and Retha Hill.
  • The National Conference for Media Reform will hold its annual conference in Boston April 8-11, 2011.  The conference brings together thousands of activists, media makers, educators, journalists, scholars, policymakers and engaged citizens to meet, tell their stories, share tactics, listen to great speakers and build the movement for better media in America.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Telling Business Stories with Soundslides” at Southern Methodist University’s Umphrey Lee Center in Dallas, April 8. Attendees must be registered for the Society of American Business Writers and Editors spring conference April 7-9.
  • March 3 is the deadline to apply for the 16th annual Minority Writers Seminar to be held April 14-17 at the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.  Experienced minority journalists receive intense training for writing opinion in a “boot camp” environment.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Covering the green economy – Follow the green money,” April 19 at noon or 4:00 p.m. Eastern time.  You will learn the skills to find the green money trail on your beat. He’ll show you how to track green stimulus projects and identify the other cash trickling from Washington into your backyard.

MAY

  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “15 tips on time management for business journalists,” May 3.  Participants will learn simple things they can immediately incorporate into their daily work and personal lives that will allow them to juggle more efficiently. You can attend the hour-long, interactive session at either noon or 4 p.m. EDT on May 3.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Beyond Google: Mining the Web for company intelligence: Online,” May 17-18 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EST.  Here’s a chance to learn the tools and techniques that competitive intelligence experts use every day — and that you can use to keep tabs on the companies on your beat.

 

JUNE

  • Internet Week New York City is being held June 6-13.  Internet Week is a week-long festival of events celebrating New York’s thriving internet industry and community.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley has opened applications for its Web 2.0 workshop June 13-17.  This training takes participants through the progression of reporting news for multiple digital platforms, starting with quick text posts and moving through photos and video and finally ending with a full multimedia presentation. The workshop provides hands-on training using Twitter and Facebook for reporting and driving web traffic, creating data-driven map mashups, dynamically updating a blog for breaking news, publishing photo galleries and audio slideshows, producing videos and editing videos using Final Cut Pro.  The deadline to apply is April 15.
  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “10 Tips for Turning National Stories into Great Local Ones,” June 21 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EDT.  Listeners will learn how to localize hot national stories.

 

JULY

  • The Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute is holding a free Webinar, “Unlocking Financial Statements,” July 18-22.  The weeklong online seminar covers income statements, balance sheets, cash flows and writing about numbers.

 

AUGUST

  • The National Association of Black Journalists is holding its annual convention and career fair Aug. 3-7, 2011, in Philadelphia.  Professional journalists, students and educators will take part in full- and half-day seminars designed to strengthen and enhance their skills. Workshops throughout the five-day convention will highlight journalism ethics, entrepreneurship, specialized journalism and transitioning journalism skills to book publishing, screen writing and media relations.

If you have any items that I’ve missed, please drop me an email via the DJTF Yahoo! Listserv or at regaviationqueen AT yahoo DOT com.  Thanks!