Tag Archives: business journalism

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

DECEMBER

  • Writing for the Web is a free, four-week (Dec. 2- Dec. 28) massive open online course (MOOC) offered by mulinblog.com. This free journalism course focuses on optimizing web texts for (a) easy online reading and (b) higher search engine ranking. This course was first offered in summer 2013 with 350 participants from more than 60 countries. It is now being offered again with revisions and updates based on feedback from the summer course participants. For enrollment instructions, visit MulinBlog Online J-School. Check out course here.
  • Learn how to create specialized apps for a certain type of news for a specific target audience with little risk in Poynter’s webinar ”How to Experiment with Specialized Mobile News Apps“ , on Wednesday, December 11 at 2 p.m. Eastern Time. While mobile device users prefer apps that focus on doing one thing well, news publishers can have more success by creating specialized apps for a certain type of news or a target audience. The webinar breaks down how these apps are made. Enroll now.
  • Prepare your newsroom to best serve the growing mobile audience in Poynter’s webinar “Changing Workflow to Create a Mobile First Newsroom” on Thursday, Dec. 12 at 2 p.m. Eastern Time. With mobile traffic approaching or surpassing desktop traffic at many news organizations, it is time for newsrooms to make sure their cultures and workflows are set up to serve this growing audience. Just like the shift from print to Web or broadcast to Web, the shift to mobile requires thinking about the audience in a different way and making fundamental changes in how we cover the news.  Enroll now.
  • The CBC-UNC Diversity Fellowship Program is an intensive hands-on workshop led by professionals at WRAL-TV in Raleigh, N.C. and the University of North Carolina journalism faculty in Chapel Hill, N.C. The program, scheduled for March 12-16, 2014,  is geared toward college seniors pursuing broadcast careers as producers, reporters, photojournalists and web editors. The deadline to apply is Dec. 15.

2014

  • If you have the skills, passion and determination to be a journalist of the future – a trained professional who knows a good story when they see it and who has the confidence to tell it in a way that best imparts its relevance and importance to news consumers – an 18-month Hearst Fellowship may be right for you. Applications are open through January.

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free workshop, “Investigating the Business of Government,” Jan. 23, 2014, preceding the Winter Convention of the Kentucky Press Association Jan. 23-24. If you dread analyzing the annual municipal budget for news and wonder how to tie government contracts to campaign-donor lists, come hone your skills at this workshop taught by investigative reporter John Cheves. The workshop will be held at the Hyatt Regency, 401 W. High St., Lexington, Ky.
  • The Reynolds Fellowship in Community Journalism is accepting applications. This fellowship is be awarded to “a journalist of accomplishment and promise who is committed to the role of the community press.” Open to journalists working at a U.S. daily and weekly newspapers with a circulation less than 50,000, journalists doing online work for community newspapers, or journalists who have established independent local news websites in communities where the circulation of the local newspaper is less than 50,000. Must be a U.S. citizen. Deadline: Jan. 31, 2014. Apply now.
  • The Nieman-Berkman Fellowships in Journalism Innovation are a collaboration between two parts of Harvard (the Nieman Foundation for Journalism and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society). This fellowship involves spending a year in residence in Cambridge, and full participation in both the Nieman and Berkman fellowship communities. Applicants must propose a specific course of study or project relating to journalism innovation. Open to working journalists or others who work for a news organization in a business, technology, or leadership capacity. Independent journalists are also welcome. Deadline: Jan. 31, 2014.Apply now.
  • The Knight-Wallace Fellowships at Michigan is now accepting applications. Spend an academic year at the Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Fellows devise a personalized study plan with access to UM courses and resources, and are encouraged to nurture their creative and artistic tendencies. Includes twice-weekly seminars as well as domestic and international travel. Deadline: Feb. 1, 2014. Apply now: U.S. and international.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free workshop, “Perfecting Personality Profiles,” Feb. 5-6 at 4:00 p.m. ET (noon PT). To make your beat coverage more accessible and engaging, you need to focus on people – those in positions of power or influence, and those who consume goods and services, work for wages and pay taxes. In the first hour of this lively two-part webinar, Pulitzer winner Jacqui Banaszynski will explore the characteristics of memorable and accurate profiles, as well as offer a range of profile approaches that can suit your purpose, publication and audience. In the second hour, on Feb. 6, she’ll dive more deeply into the reporting and writing techniques that can help any beat reporter pursue sparkling profiles.
  • Investigative Reporters and Editors and National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting (NICAR) will hold their 2014 Computer-Assisted Reporting Conference in Baltimore, Md., Feb. 27, 2014 – March 2, 2014. Join IRE and NICAR for their annual conference devoted to computer-assisted reporting. Come and learn about tools you need to dig deeper into stories and give readers and viewers the information they want.

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will hold a free workshop, “Social Media ROI for Journalists,” March 4 at  4:00 p.m ET (noon PT). In 2013, more and more newsrooms will revisit their social media strategy and ask, “What’s our return on investment?” How do we know if our newsroom is doing social “correctly”? What does this mean for our organization’s bottom line? This free, one-hour webinar will help you answer those questions on March 4.

  • The best in the business will gather for more than 100 panels, hands-on classes and special presentations about covering business, public safety, government, health care, education, the military, the environment and other key beats at the 2014 IRE conference June 26-29, 2014 in San Francisco. Speakers will share strategies for locating documents and gaining access to public records, finding the best stories and managing investigations. Join the discussion about how to practice investigative journalism in print, broadcast, Web and alternative newsroom models.

If you have items you wish to include, please email them to me at benet AT aviationqueen DOT COM. Thanks!!

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

By Ameena Rasheed, NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force Intern

Webbmedia Group has a great mega calendar of events that catches things not covered below. If you want to subscribe to the calendar, click here. You can also subscribe to this calendar so the information appears on your personal Google Calendar. Just go to the Webbmedia Google calendar, click the “+Google Calendar” icon at the bottom right, and then click “Yes, add this calendar” in the dialog box). The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism has its training calendar posted for courses through June 2013.

MARCH

  • The National Association of Black Journalists will be hosting the 2013 NABJ Region 3 Conference on March 8-10 at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina. The conference program will offer participants an opportunity to sharpen old skills, learn new ones, and engage in valuable networking.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is holding a free online webinar, “Branding for Journalists: You Being You,” March 5, 2013, at noon or 4:00 p.m., EST. In this webinar, Robin J. Phillips, the Reynolds Center’s digital director, will show you some simple tips to take control of your image, and accentuate the value of who you are and what you do best – apart from your news organization.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC-Berkeley is offering an intensive 9-week graduate level certificate program, “Content & Strategy,” which focuses on the strategic implementation and production of digital media content combining seminar style instruction with practical hands-on training. The program is from March 5 through May 2. There will be presentations by world-class trainers, award-winning journalists and industry leaders, including Richard Koci Hernandez, Len De Groot, Jerry Monti. Tuition costs are $5,900. For more information, click here.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC-Berkeley is hosting a two-day, hands-on certification program, “Create Meaning from Data,” focused on communicating complex information with visually appealing charts, graphs and maps. It will be held March 8-9 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at UC-Berkeley’s North Gate Hall. Tuition costs $645. Participants will learn to create a clearer, more meaningful picture of complex statistics and publicly available data, tell stories with interactive GIS maps, and create beautiful and effective graphs and charts. Click here to register.
  • The Investigative Reporters and Editors are hosting the “2013 Salt Lake City Watchdog Workshop” in Salt Lake City, Utah on Friday, March 15 through Saturday, March 16. This training will offer several of our core sessions that will improve your ability to find information on the Web quickly, and point you to key documents and data that will help you add depth to your daily work and produce quick-hit enterprise stories. In addition, this workshop will give you tips on bulletproofing stories, digging deeper on the Web with social media, search engines and much more. Workshop fees: $55 Professional, $25 Student and $30 Optional Computer-Assisted Reporting Training. Registration closes on Friday, March 8 at 7 p.m.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is holding a free online webinar, “Power Searching for Business Journalists,” March 19 at noon EST. In this free, hour-long online training, Google senior research scientist Daniel M. Russell will offer his tips, techniques and strategies for using Google to find what might seem to be impossible.
  • The Future Journalism Project, media initiative which explores disruption, opportunity and innovation across the media landscape, is looking for spring 2013 interns.
  • Harvard Writers is hosting a 3-day course, “Achieving Healthcare Leadership and Outcomes through Writing and Publishing,” for physicians, healthcare professionals and writers who want to publish nonfiction in print form. The course will be held at the Boston Marriott Cambridge in Cambridge, M.A..
  • The Knight Digital Media Center at UC-Berkeley is hosting a two-day, hands-on certification program, “Create Meaning from Data,” focused on communicating complex information with visually appealing charts, graphs and maps. It will be held March 8-9 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at UC-Berkeley’s North Gate Hall. Tuition costs $645. Participants will learn to create a clearer, more meaningful picture of complex statistics and publicly available data, tell stories with interactive GIS maps, and create beautiful and effective graphs and charts. Click here to register.
  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is holding a free online webinar, “Power Searching for Business Journalists,” March 19 at noon EST. In this free, hour-long, online training, Google senior research scientist Daniel M. Russell will offer his tips, techniques and strategies for using Google to find what might seem to be impossible.
  • The Digital Media Summit will be returning to Toronto on March 19-20 at the Toronto Marriott Eaton Center Hotel. You can use the promo code DMSMASH13 to receive a discount on the delegate badge.

APRIL

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will award two $1,000 fellowships to attend the annual conference of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) in Washington April 4-6. NABJ member Christopher Nelson, a freelance journalist based in Baltimore, was one of last year’s winners.
  • Beginning in 2013, UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism will each year offer five $10,000 postgraduate Food and Farming Journalism Fellowships. The fellowship, a project of the Knight Center in Science and Environmental Journalism, is supported by a grant from The 11th Hour Project, a program of The Schmidt Family Foundation. Online applications are due April 1. The program will announce this year’s fellows by May 1.
  • The Data Visualization Summit will be taking place on April 10-13 in San Francisco. The summit brings together leaders in Data Viz to explain and clarifiy the numerous benefits of using data visualization. If you would like to attend please contact Victoria Elton at velton@theiegroup.com.

MAY

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is holding a free two-part online webinar, “Getting the Goods – Interviews that Work,” on May 8-9 at noon or 4:00 p.m. EST. Pulitzer Prize winner Jacqui Banaszynski will explore the core purposes, techniques and ethics of the interview process. She will reveal different interview approaches that work best in different situations and that apply to any genre of journalism. On Day 2, she will focus on interviews that produce not just information, but true stories, rich with character, scene and detail.

JUNE

  • The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is holding a free two-part online webinar, “The Business of Me,” June 4-6 at noon or 4:00 p.m. In this three-day webinar with Mark Luckie of Twitter, learn how to brand and market yourself and to pitch your ideas, plus understand the basics of financial and time management. Identify five next steps to advance your career as an entrepreneur.
  • The Knight Digital Media Center is taking applications for its two-week “Multimedia Storytelling Institute 2013,” June 10-21 at UC-Berkeley. This intensive two-week program provides seminar style and hands-on training in essential skills for digital media production. The institute is ideal for journalists, educators and communication professionals interested in a rapid-paced immersible experience in multimedia content creation through delivery. The cost is $5,400; there’s a 10% discount if you register before May 10.
  • The Online News Association is partnering with the Global Editors Network to present several sessions at the Global News Summit 2013: Hack the Newsroom! (#GEN2013) conference on June 19-21 in Paris, France at Hotel de Ville, 5 rue de Lobau, 75004 Paris. The conference will feature industry experts giving you the tools and strategies you need to help seed, encourage and implement experimentation and start-up culture in your digital newsroom. Registration is open to all ONA members and you can save 30 percent on registration if you purchase your tickets by Feb. 18. Early bird tickets are € 839 ($1,119.95) for GEN and ONA members and € 1,199 ($1,600.31).

JULY

  • The National Association of Black Journalists welcomes you to join us from July 31-August 4, 2013 as we gather in Orlando for the 38th Annual Convention and Career Fair! Thousands of journalists, media executives, public relations professionals, and students are expected to attend to network, participate in professional development sessions and celebrate excellence in journalism.

If you have items you wish to include, please email them to me at benet AT aviationqueen DOT COM. Thanks!!

Top Five Reasons to Apply for the Reynolds Center for Business Journalism Fellowship

By Christopher E. Nelson, NBC News Assignment Editor

Nelson at a CAR workshop in 2012 taught by Jaimi Dowdell (foreground), training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors.  Photo courtesy of Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, via Flickr.

Nelson at a CAR workshop in 2012 taught by Jaimi Dowdell (foreground), training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors. Photo courtesy of Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, via Flickr.

Last spring I was fortunate enough to receive one two Reynolds Center for Business Journalism fellowships, which allowed me to attend the Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference. For me, it was an eye-opening experience and my first real exposure to the world of business journalism.

In addition to attending the SABEW conference I was also fortunate enough to receive computer assisted reporting training through a workshop presented by the Reynolds Center in conjunction with Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc.  So here are my reasons why you should apply for this year’s fellowships.
1. The business beat is a comprehensive one.
Business reporters have to know a little about a lot. Almost every day their stories could include bits about politics, government, the economy, society and culture. If you choose to become a business journalist, you’ll learn to be a better journalist,  and without a doubt you’ll become a better informed one.
 
2. Journalists of color are underrepresented on the business beat.
As a journalist of color, you might want to consider business journalism. There are a number of business networks on TV.  CNBC, Bloomberg, and Fox Business, but also new and relatively new outlets from Atlantic Media’s Quartz to BusinessInsider.com. These outlets are making solid attempts at explaining money matters in interesting ways.
3. You’ll learn about the future of the journalism industry.
At last year’s SABEW conference, I heard more about data visualization  something I was not all that familiar with. Data visualization jobs are an emerging hot job in journalism as papers, and web outlets hire reporters who can communicate important information in a great way.
4. It’s a great opportunity to meet industry leaders who have excelled at different beats, and then made a new path by writing about business and the economy.
From Diana Henriques, who literally wrote the book on Bernie Madoff to sports business reporter Sam Mamudi to personal finance columnist Gail Marks Jarvis, I heard incredible stories from some of the best in the business about the world of business. Who would have thought you could talk crime, politics, sports, and so much more at a conference of business writers?
5. Winning a Reynolds Center Fellowship is only the beginning; it truly opens the door to what the Reynolds Center can offer you — lots and lots of FREE training.
Even after attending SABEW, I’ve found that the Reynolds Center continues to offer free training that is not only interesting, but quite informative. It’s so important to stay current on trends, and hot topics, and the Reynolds Center helps journalists to do that, free of charge.
So apply today and become one of the Reynolds Center 2013 Fellows! It’s a great experience that continues to pay off.
- Nelson is an assignment editor at NBC News based in New York. He was a 2012 Reynolds Center for Business Journalism Fellow and attended SABEW 2012 in Indianapolis.

Where Are The Journalists Of Color Covering The Business Beat?

By Christopher Nelson, freelance journalist and graduate student, Georgetown University Law Center

I recently had the privilege of attending the Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference in Indianapolis, Indiana as a Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism fellow. It was an enriching experience, a welcome opportunity to have an up close and personal introduction to the world of business and economics reporting.

Still, one thing struck me while there: the lack of people of color at the conference. Given the importance of reporting on the economy, including jobs numbers, the growth or lack thereof of national and international companies, consumer spending, tax policy, trade policy, and myriad other issues, it was quite startling. So I decided to explore the topic of diversity in business reporting.

As an African-American journalist, I decided to look at this in terms of the state of the black business journalist.  From personal experience, I know members of the National Association of Black Journalists who cover business news, including: Kortney Stringer, retail editor, the Associated Press; Michelle Singletary, Personal Finance Columnist, the Washington Post; Alfred Edmond Jr., Editor at Large, Black Enterprise magazine; Sharon Epperson, senior commodities correspondent and personal finance correspondent, CNBC; and Valerie Coleman Morris veteran business news anchor, just to name a few.

Yet, I wondered why there aren’t more faces that reflect America’s growing diversity?  “The thing about blacks and business journalism is we need to be there,” said Shartia Brantley, a segment producer for CNBC’s “Street Signs.”

Back in late 2008 media columnist Richard Prince used his column to explore whether the state of the economy would make business reporting more attractive for journalists of color.

Brantley who earned her master’s in journalism from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism also has her MBA from the Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University.  Before becoming a journalist she was a marketing analyst and corporate consultant. For her, working for CNBC  has been a way to merge her multiple passions and a prime opportunity inform viewers about a subject in which she is well versed.

“With all that’s happened with the mortgage crisis, the credit crisis everyone is more engaged,” she added.

In order to fill the void she sees, she files weekly business briefs and other reports for TheGrio.com, NBC News’ African-American oriented videocentric news site. Brantley’s cadre of stories ranging from the need for consumers to do more to protect their pockets, to the credit crunch’s impact on black churches shows there are stories waiting to be told.

A recent Nielsen report completed in conjunction with the National Newspaper Publishers Association, the consortium of African-American newspapers, notes that by 2015, “African-Americans are projected to spend $1.1 trillion annually.”

Economic empowerment of consumers is also a top priority for civil rights organizations like the National Urban League, and the NAACP.

Traditionally any effects of the economic crisis have hit the black community particularly hard, by some measures such as the jobless rate.  So who will ensure that communities of color aren’t overlooked, that business stories appeal to a wider cross-section of Americans? Will more journalists of color look to business and economics as a specialty?

Resources

Academic Programs

 

 

Learning About Business News

By Christopher Nelson, freelance journalist and graduate student, Georgetown University Law Center

Last week I had the privilege of being a Reynolds Center for Business Journalism fellow at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference in Indianapolis. It was my first real exposure to business journalism as a concentration.

As a veteran television assignment editor and web producer, I’ve had exposure to lots of breaking news, political stories and natural disasters, yet I’ve never really focused on the economy and business stories. When not helping to get things on T.V., my writing for online outlets most of my work has focused on media and race. At a time in which economic news is such a crucial story, I felt it necessary to look deeper at a subject that every day affects the lives of everyday people.

SABEW as an organization is nearly 50 years old. Their members work at some of the most respected news outlets from across the country, including the Associated Press, Reuters, Dow Jones Newswire, Bloomberg News, CNBC, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Fortune Magazine and a slew of other outlets. When it comes to covering the economy, I learned that SABEW members are not only reporting on the day’s of events, but helping to forecast what’s to come, and taking a look back at how history plays in role in how the economy fairs.

My experience at SABEW actually kicked off before the convention officially got under way as I attended a free daylong training session “Be a Better Business Watchdog – CAR for Business Journalists.”  It was my first opportunity to take a computer assisted reporting class and it immediately opened my eyes.

Jaimi Dowdell, training director for Investigative Reporters and Editors helped show my fellow participants and I on how the data we gathered through research could help us craft stories about a variety of economic stories wherever we were from. It was a great crash course into one facet of business journalism.

Over the course of the next two days, I had the chance to hear from various keynote speakers such as Richard Cordray the new director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, who outlined the mission of his agency, which is currently being built from the ground up.

Cordray said the CFPB is committed to helping educate consumers in a way which allows them to make responsible financial decisions, enforce rules and regulations which keep personal finance companies in line and protect consumers, and study the intersection of the consumers, finance companies, and the economic markets.

Other workshops gave an up close look at how to deconstruct and assess the accuracy of economic development studies, understand the growth in sports business reporting, better tell complex business, and economic stories in a comprehensible, and of course, take a close look at the changing landscape of the media.

SABEW’s conference ended on an up note with its “Best in Business” Awards, which highlighted the remarkable work being done by business journalists across the country and around the world. Whether online, in print, or on television, the stories gave everyone a better sense as to the economy, one of the true forces which truly makes the world go round.

In my next post I’ll explore another important topic, diversity in the business reporting ranks.

Why I Love My Business Journalism Job

By Benét J. Wilson, DJTF co-chair, Online Managing Editor-Business Aviation, Aviation Week Group

One of the regular items on my Google Reader is content from the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, which is located at Arizona State University.  The center offers free training, fellowships, tips and story ideas, among other things.

Yesterday, they released a new study, entitled “U.S. business journalists’ median salary is $56,220, Reynolds Center survey finds.”  Although I’ve known the information in the study for years in my own career as a business journalist, I’m glad to see it confirmed what I and other business journalists already knew.

U.S. business journalists reported a median salary of $56,220 for 2010-11, according to the center’s research. Other findings included: 14% of those business journalists surveyed in mid-July said their newsroom was currently hiring full-time journalists, and one in five said their newsroom had shrunk in the past six months.  The research also found this breakdown for median salaries by place of employment in 2010-11:

  • Print: $50,100
  • Freelancing: $54,091
  • Broadcast: $55,588
  • Online: $57,308
  • Wire services: $78,438.

My whole career has been on the trade/B2B side of journalism.  Besides the great pay,  I feel I’ve had better career opportunities, a more flexible work schedule and a beat that is overflowing with story potential.  And did I mention that in a 20+ year career, I’ve never worked over the Thanksgiving weekend or over Christmas? I encourage you to read the report and consider business journalism as a career option.  I also encourage you to take advantage of the training offered by the center to help you reach your goals.