Category Archives: journalism

Friday Fast Five: Your Guide To New Media – The Google Edition

I wish there was just one place that was home to the master list of Google hacks. But until then, check out these five that can be handy right now.

  1. Google – Public Data Explorer
  2. Lifehacker – Create Customizable GeoMaps with Google Sheets 
  3. Gigaom – How get the most out of Google’s apps and services when using an iPad 
  4. Digital Telepathy – Google Spreadsheets: More Useful Than You Thought
  5. About.com Travel – Make your own Google maps

Friday Fast Five: Your Guide To New Media

Every week we share five articles/tips/hacks to help you do your job as a storyteller easier and smarter. Here are this week’s entries.

  1. LinkedIn7 Social Login Myths Debunked
  2. PBS6 Great Apps to Help You Write
  3. BusinessWeekFive Things Developers Wish Their Nontech Colleagues Knew
  4. GigaomJournalism isn’t just about informing readers, it’s also about helping them take action
  5. Business Daily – The Best Add-Ons for Google Drive 

Calendar of Multimedia Training and Events

We’re back! Here’s a quick list of events through the end of the year.  We’ll have a bigger calendar next week. Meanwhile, if you have items you wish to include, please email them to me at benet AT aviationqueen DOT COM. Thanks!!

DECEMBER

  • The Tow Center for Digital Journalism and the Information Society Project of Yale Law School have partnered to present this series of 5 lectures as part of the larger Journalism After Snowden project this Fall. Journalism After Snowden: Finding and Protecting Intelligence Sources After Snowden, a lecture with James Bamford on Tuesday, December 2, 2014, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm. The lecture will be held at Yale Law School – 127 Wall Street, New Haven, Connecticut,  Room 122. An RSVP Required via Eventbrite. Whistleblowers are very rare, and it is even more rare when one comes knocking on your door as Edward Snowden did with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras.  Instead, journalists covering national security and intelligence need to develop sources from scratch.  And once developed, they need to be protected.  In his talk James Bamford will discuss some ways to develop sources and also ways to protect them.  He will also talk about Edward Snowden and his thoughts on sources and whistleblowers.  Bamford spent three days with him in Moscow last summer for a cover story in Wired magazine.
  • The Tow Center for Digital Journalism and the Information Society Project of Yale Law School have partnered to present this series of 5 lectures as part of the larger Journalism After Snowden project this Fall. Journalism After Snowden – In Defense of Leaks, a lecture with Jill Abramson on Wednesday, December 3, 2014, from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm in Pulitzer Hall – 3rd Floor World Room. RSVP Required via Eventbrite. Jill Abramson is a journalist who spent the last 17 years in the most senior editorial positions at The New York Times, where she was the first woman to serve as Washington Bureau Chief, Managing Editor and Executive Editor. Before joining the Times, she spent nine years at The Wall Street Journal as the Deputy Washington Bureau Chief and an investigative reporter covering money and politics. She is currently a lecturer with the department of English at Harvard University.
  • The Tow Center for Digital Journalism presents Tow Tea: Understanding the Role of Algorithms and Data at BuzzFeed on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014, from 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm at the Brown Institute for Media Innovation. RSVP encouraged via Eventbrite. Ky Harlin, Director of Data Science for Buzzfeed will join us along with an editor and reporter from Buzzfeed. Together, they will help us understand the relationship between content and data—How does Buzzfeed predict whether a story will go viral?  What is shareability?  Do reporters and editors at Buzzfeed make editorial decisions based on input from data scientists who track traffic and social networks?  What is the day-to-day workflow like at Buzzfeed and how are methods employed different than those used in traditional newsroom settings? For questions about this event, please contact Smitha Khorana, Tow Center DMA, at sk3808@columbia.edu.
  • The National Association of Black Journalists’ Digital Journalism Task Force and the Diverse Social Media Editors & Digital Journalists group present “The Road To Social Media Success,” a FREE webinar with Huffington Post Columnist Sean Gardner. Gardner will offer tips on how to step up your social media game. The webinar will be held on Thursday, December 11, 2014, at 8:00 p.m. EST. Register today!

MARCH

  • The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) will host the Region III conference March 5-8, 2015, aboard the Carnival cruise line to the Bahamas. This conference will feature diverse programming for freelance and transitioning journalists, public relations practitioners, entrepreneurs and students.  A $100 per person deposit deadline is Monday, December 15, 2014; the final balance is due by Sunday, January 4, 2015.
  • Journalists, media and communication professionals and students are invited to participate in the 2015 National Association of Black Journalists Region VI Conference, March 13-14,2015, in Oakland, California. The event – which takes place at the Waterfront Hotel in Oakland’s Jack London Square – will begin with a Friday night mixer reception at Lungamore’s @ Jack London Square followed by a full day of workshops, which will offer information and discussion on the impact and future of technology in the media and communications industries. Saturday’s sessions will end with a dinner/dance open to all participants.

 

10 Workshop Ideas For #NABJ40 In Minneapolis

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The call to submit workshop proposals and speakers for the 2015 NABJ Annual Convention and Career Fair in Minneapolis has been opened.  Tracks for workshops are:  Engage, Immerse, Specialize, Inform, Learn and Know.

According to the NABJ website, proposals will be reviewed based on the following criteria:

• Is the topic innovative and relevant?

• Is the session well-organized and designed to meet the needs of this particular audience?

• Are the session objectives and “takeaways” for participants clearly explained in the proposal?

Seeing this, I came up with 10 workshop ideas I hope members will submit to the Program Committee.  Remember — you can’t complain about programming if you don’t submit anything. The deadline is Sunday, Nov. 16.  Good luck!

  1. Media Ethics in a Web 3.0 World
  2. Adding a Dash of Data to your Journalism
  3. How To Make Your Web Stories Clickalicious
  4. monetizing My Blog
  5. Becoming a WordPress Rock Star
  6. How Crowd-sourcing Can Be am Effective News Gathering Tool
  7. How to break into INSERT BEAT HERE
  8. How to Develop Effective Multiplatform Stories
  9. Multimedia training for seasoned journalists
  10. How to Survive and Thrive as a Freelance Journalist

Benét J. Wilson is the vice president of education for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force and served as NABJ Program Committee chair in 2012 and 2013.  She also serves on the board of the Online News Association.  She is  the social media/eNewsletters editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and  a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.

Apply for Diversity Travel Fellowship to Attend Science Writers Conference

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The upcoming Science Writers 2014 Conference is sure to be an amazing experience. I am hoping that many NABJ members consider attending this conference because of the number and variety of professional and networking opportunities it offers.

Here is a chance to attend and have your conference costs covered. Announcing the NASW Diversity Travel Fellowship. Sponsored by a generous NASW Idea Grant, these travel awards (5 at $1,000 each) were created to encourage underrepresented minorities in science journalism to attend the ScienceWriters2014 conference in Columbus, Ohio.

US based underrepresented minority journalists are encouraged to apply especially African-, Hispanic-, and Native-Americans who have journalism experience in STEM, medicine, health, environment, technology, etc.

The grant continues my ongoing work with DiverseScholar and our work to increase diversity in the science communication workforce.  Why does diversity matter in science communication? We already know that diversity impacts what information in brought before different audiences. Science-related information is no different, but because its important role in each of our lives diverse perspectives matter even more. Delivering culturally relevant health, science, technology, and environmental news is important and is the key to addressing disparities in access to essential services and future career opportunities in these growing fields.

The meeting offers several networking opportunities to connect with other journalists, science communicators and scientists. You’ll hear speakers talk about current research related to society issues and information perception, science-related policy issues such as GMO biotechnology, impact of culture in reinforcing racial and sexist stereotypes, health care and public health.

This conference will be awesome, so apply for the travel award.

More details about the application and fellowship are here. Application includes 10 survey questions, upload your resume or CV and one 500+ word essay asking applicants to describe the importance of diversity in science communication. Preview the entire application at this link. Deadline to apply is Friday August 29 at 11:55 pm PST using this online application.

Connect to other Science Communicators on Twitter and connect to other Science Writing conference attendees.

#SciWri14

#mediadiversity

#DivSciWri

@ScienceWriting

@ScienceWriters

@TheDarkSci

@CultureDish

Meeting registration opens August 15, 2014. But apply today. Deadline for the fellowship is August 29. If you have questions about the travel fellowship direct them to me, @DNLee5 and @MinorityPostdoc.

danielle-lee2Dr. Danielle N. Lee is an NABJ and NASW member, a science blogger and co-founder of the National Science & Technology News Service.

Vote No for Proposed NABJ Constitutional Amendments

Thank you members of the NABJ Constitutional Committee for your hard work on our governance model and structure.

The amendment to change the way NABJ is governed has brought some serious debate over how our nonprofit organization should operate in a changing digital media landscape. I voted NO to amend the NABJ Constitution. Membership categories should not be expanded as outlined in the amendment.

For example, the emerging journalist category disenfranchises working journalists with less than five years experience. I joined NABJ as a student member in 1977, two years after the organization started. Like so many other young people during the first five years of our careers, we paid our dues, found our way to regional meetings, and if we were lucky, the national convention. By any means necessary.

As young leaders, we sought out leadership. We served in NABJ local chapters. We positioned ourselves to run for a seat on the national board. Our next generation of journalists should experience the extraordinary times that we did. And more.

We should not create an emerging journalist membership category that excludes members from serving on the national board during the first five years of their careers.

Sheila Brooks is a former NABJ Secretary (1986-91), a three-term national board member, founder of NABJ-TV and the NABJ Monitor, and NABJ member since 1977

Nominations Open for Victor Cohn Prize for Medical Science Reporting

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Here is a chance to nominate a colleague or self-nominate for the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing most prestigious prize – the Cohn Prize for excellence in medical science reporting.

The award celebrates a journalist who has produced a body of work that is tough, high-impact medical journalism. Since the award was launched in 2000, mostly reporters at larger mainstream media organizations have won the award. But freelancers are also eligible. There is a wealth of very impactful work written about health science produced at less-visible Black owned or regional outlets.

No doubt that the nomination committee has been missing out on great medical science reporting directed at minority audiences. This year, CASW will consider online work. This opens up a tremendous opportunity for NABJ members, specifically Healthy NABJ and Digital Journalism Task Force journalists.

The deadline to apply is Thursday, July 31, 2013. Apply online or by mail. Nominators and candidates may submit materials here.  Letters of

support may be uploaded either as part of the nomination package or via a separate submission form provided for recommenders.

Prize includes a $3,000 cash award and travel to ScienceWriters2014 annual meeting in Columbus, Ohio. More information about the award, including a list of previous awardees, is here.

Best of luck.

Interested in learning more about science writing and science writing career resources, then check out these Science and Diversity in Science Writing resources:

  • #DivSciWri = Diversity and Science Writing/Diverse Science Writers hashtag;
  • @TheDarkSci – Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics to African-American audiences through media advocacy;
  • @CultureDish – Cultivating diversity in science writing; and
  • Voices: A blog at Scientific American that explores and celebrates diversity in science.

Additional Science and Health Science Writing resources:

  • @AHCJ – Association of Health Care Journalists is an independent, nonprofit org. improving health care journalism;
  • @ScienceWriting – Council for the Advancement of Science Writing. CASW organizes New Horizons in Science and other programs for science writers; and
  • @ScienceWriters – National Association of Science Writers fosters the dissemination of accurate information regarding science.

Dr. Danielle N. Lee, @DNLee5, is a science blogger and member of the National Science & Technology News Service.