Category Archives: Conferences & Conventions

Apply for Diversity Travel Fellowship to Attend Science Writers Conference

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The upcoming Science Writers 2014 Conference is sure to be an amazing experience. I am hoping that many NABJ members consider attending this conference because of the number and variety of professional and networking opportunities it offers.

Here is a chance to attend and have your conference costs covered. Announcing the NASW Diversity Travel Fellowship. Sponsored by a generous NASW Idea Grant, these travel awards (5 at $1,000 each) were created to encourage underrepresented minorities in science journalism to attend the ScienceWriters2014 conference in Columbus, Ohio.

US based underrepresented minority journalists are encouraged to apply especially African-, Hispanic-, and Native-Americans who have journalism experience in STEM, medicine, health, environment, technology, etc.

The grant continues my ongoing work with DiverseScholar and our work to increase diversity in the science communication workforce.  Why does diversity matter in science communication? We already know that diversity impacts what information in brought before different audiences. Science-related information is no different, but because its important role in each of our lives diverse perspectives matter even more. Delivering culturally relevant health, science, technology, and environmental news is important and is the key to addressing disparities in access to essential services and future career opportunities in these growing fields.

The meeting offers several networking opportunities to connect with other journalists, science communicators and scientists. You’ll hear speakers talk about current research related to society issues and information perception, science-related policy issues such as GMO biotechnology, impact of culture in reinforcing racial and sexist stereotypes, health care and public health.

This conference will be awesome, so apply for the travel award.

More details about the application and fellowship are here. Application includes 10 survey questions, upload your resume or CV and one 500+ word essay asking applicants to describe the importance of diversity in science communication. Preview the entire application at this link. Deadline to apply is Friday August 29 at 11:55 pm PST using this online application.

Connect to other Science Communicators on Twitter and connect to other Science Writing conference attendees.

#SciWri14

#mediadiversity

#DivSciWri

@ScienceWriting

@ScienceWriters

@TheDarkSci

@CultureDish

Meeting registration opens August 15, 2014. But apply today. Deadline for the fellowship is August 29. If you have questions about the travel fellowship direct them to me, @DNLee5 and @MinorityPostdoc.

danielle-lee2Dr. Danielle N. Lee is an NABJ and NASW member, a science blogger and co-founder of the National Science & Technology News Service.

You Are Invited to the Science Writers 2014 Conference

 

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I am back from the 2014 NABJ Conference in Boston, Massachusetts and I fired up! There were so many great conversations happening. I was especially excited about the series of panels arranged by Healthy NABJ. These panels explored the critical role of journalism in better healthcare delivery to underserved populations.

But it wasn’t just about healthcare, folks were discussing technology, and weather preparedness, sports, fashion, beauty, and more. Though not explicitly covered, but all of these topics have very, very strong science, technology, engineering, and math foundations (STEM). Science is at the heart of so many of stories that NABJ members deliver.

Which is why I am inviting my fellow NABJ members to the annual Science Writers Conference, October 17-20, 2014 in Columbus, Ohio. The conference is hosted by the National Association of Science Writers (NASW) and Council for the Advancement of Science Writing (CASW). The meeting offers several fun networking and engaging professional development opportunities: Friday reception, Saturday, a Sunday party, Lunch With a Scientist, two days of stellar research presentations (e.g. CASW’s New Horizons in Science), lab tours and field trips through Tuesday. Registration for the meeting opens August 15, 2014.

Trust me, this meeting will enrich you. Full agenda is here, but here are the highlights.

1. Saturday morning panel on Media Diversity, with NABJ Digital Taskforce Co-Chair Tracie Powell.

2. The Culture Dish Mixer, a chance for minority journalists connected to each other and to the larger science writing community and a mixer at ScienceWriters2014.

3. Sunday morning opening speaker, Brad Bushman will give a briefing on the New Horizons in Science. His research examines how stereotypes about race/ethnicity and gender are heightened by violent media and violent video games. His work and that of Mahzarin Banari’s, explores how the culture of violence may be nurturing racism and sexism. This definitely impacts news delivery across beats.

4. The Sunday program will also include discussions about the brave-new-world possibilities of “genome editing” and “gene drives” as well as the messages people are getting about genetically modified food crops. These technologies will require society to make careful policy choices. It’s important that all communities, especially those that have historically-tenuous relationships with science such as African-Americans, be well-informed about these new technologies and that diverse voices are heard. Speakers include George Church and Allison Snow.

5. Public health issues are of strong interest to minority communities and NABJ has a very active Healthy NABJ team. Maura Gillison will give a talk on HPV that will connect public health, individual behavior and genomic analysis to explain how she’s trying to reduce the incidence of head and neck cancer. In addition, the session by Jan Kiecolt-Glaser and Martha Belury on marital stress and health is going to make some surprising new connections with obesity and depression.

6. How to write for local and non-science publications. This session will feature freelance journalists who have found success pitching science-related news stories to smaller outlets and those that do not traditionally cover science. This session will be especially useful for journalists interested in pitching stories to minority-serving news outlets.

7. Plus there will be opportunities to meet and interview a number of scientists. Including leading Latino- and African-American scientists whose research impacts their communities and whose service works to diversity our US STEM workforce. Meet Alán Aspuru-Guzik, a lively scientist who has been a mentor to a number of Hispanic students and postdocs at Harvard. He’s enthusiastic about promoting interest in science, especially in his homeland of Mexico, and is also a great interview. Also meet Erich Jarvis, co-leader of a large avian phylogeny project that will make a multi-paper release this fall.

This meeting will be awesome. I want to see you there! Make plans to attend. But if you still need more info, check out these recaps from ScienceWriters2013 by CASW and KSJ Tracker; and prepare for the conference with advice from SciLance and Open Notebook.

Follow along on Twitter and connect to other conference attendees.

  • #SciWri14
  • #mediadiversity
  • #DivSciWri
  • @ScienceWriting
  • @ScienceWriters
  • @TheDarkSci
  • @CultureDish

danielle-lee2Dr. Danielle N. Lee is an NABJ and NASW member, a science blogger and co-founder of the National Science & Technology News Service.

Take Your Journalism Career To The Next Level: Sign Up For The Executive Suite

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Every year at the National Association of Black Journalists Annual Convention & Career Fair, members looking to move up the career ladder have access to a unique program: The Executive Suite, July 30-31, 2014.

The Executive Suite is an exclusive series of workshops led by news and corporate executives designed to help middle managers who aspire to more senior roles to gain a better sense of what it takes o be an executive editor, a publisher, a news director or a general manager.  Attendees of the two-day program walk away with a better understanding of the skills and relationships it takes to land and keep those jobs. From hiring and managing to building the skills and connections you’ll need to move up, the Executive Suite will help you prepare for advancement.

The speakers read like a who’s who of media executives, including:

  • David Boardman, President, American Society of News Editors;
  • Jill Geisler, Senior Faculty, Leadership and Management Programs, The Poynter Institute;
  • Deborah Adams Simmons, Vice President, News Development, Advance Local;
  • Alfredo Carbajal, Managing Editor, The Dallas Morning News/Al Dia;
  • Mizell Stewart, Senior Vice President, News, E. W. Scripps Newspapers; and
  • Ingrid Ciprian-Matthews, Vice President, News, CBS News.

And there will be a special event on Thursday, July 31 when Keith Woods, Vice President of Diversity for NPR leads a conversation with Arthur O. Sulzberger, Jr., Publisher of the New York Times, and Dean Baquet, Executive Editor, of the Times.

The good news is that they are still taking applications — but only until Friday, July 25. So if you think you have what it takes — or know someone else who does — send an email coordinator Duschene Drew, Managing Editor for Operations, Newsroom at the Star-Tribune at  ddrew@startribune.com. And please put  Executive Suite in the subject line. In the email, tell him why you think you deserve to be in the Executive Suite. It wouldn’t hurt to include a resume or a link to your portfolio website. And please — pass this along to anyone you think may benefit from this great programming in Boston!

Benét J. Wilson is the vice president of education for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force.  She also serves on the board of the Online News Association.  She is  the social media/eNewsletters editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and  a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.

NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force Holds #NABJ14 TweetChat

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NABJ’s Digital Journalism Task Force held its annual convention TweetChat July 15  to help attendees get ready for Boston. Check out tips given by veteran NABJ convention attendees Kelly Carter, Kathy Chaney, Kirstin Garriss and Justin Madden. We hope tips provided in this Storify  to prepare for Boston will be helpful!

How To Prepare Your Reel for the 2014 NABJ Conference

The NABJ conference is around the corner and it’s time to get the reels ready!

This online webinar will help producers and on-camera people to prepare their reels for the 2014 NABJ conference. Jummy Olabanji is the noon anchor for WLJA-TV in Washington, D.C. and Caleb Wilkerson is a supervising producer for the Discovery Network. Together they have more than 15 years of experience in the television and online video industries. They will go over reels that worked and reels that didn’t work so you can be ready to sell yourself at the conference.

 

Title: How To Prepare Your Reel for the NABJ Conference

Date: Thursday, July 17, 2014

Time: 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT

REGISTER HERE

 https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/170895206

 

 

Jummy Olabanji

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Jummy Olabanji currently anchors Good Morning Washington and ABC7 News at Noon. Helping the Washington area wake up is a dream come true for this hometown girl. Jummy was raised in Fairfax County and graduated from Westfield High School in Chantilly. Go Bulldogs!
The Emmy award-winning reporter and anchor joined ABC7/WJLA-TV and NewsChannel 8 in 2011. Since joining Washington’s most-trusted news team she has covered several including the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the shooting at the Washington Navy Yard.
Prior to returning to the D.C. metro area, Jummy spent several years of working as a reporter and anchor at WTKR-TV in Norfolk and WCAV-TV in Charlottesville. She started her career as a news assistant at CNN’s Washington D.C. bureau.  

Caleb Wilkerson

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Caleb Wilkerson is an multi Emmy and Webby Award winning creative professional who is a Supervising Producer for Discovery. As a skilled video director, producer, editor, and digital media strategist whose video credits also include, ESPN, USA TODAY, NBC Sports, HBO, and NFL Films.

As a dedicated creative leader with a deep passion for technology and storytelling, Caleb has produced and directed videos across multiple platforms for more than 10 years covering many major events. In the digital media space he has led the online video strategies for household names such as USA TODAY, NBC Sports, and Forbes Magazine helping to shape their multimedia vision.

While in the television space, Caleb has worked as a director and producer at NFL Films and ESPN covering more than 10 Super Bowls and helping to capture pivotal moments in sports history while crafting compelling features for programs such as Showtime’s Inside the NFL, ESPN’s NFL Films Presents and most recently the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

Caleb is a proud father of a 18-month son named Cameron James and is currently in the process of working on a documentary for HBO Films.

DJTF Partners With Knight Foundation On JournoPreneur Panel In Boston

 

nabj_djtf_200x200logo wordsThe Digital Journalism Task Force will be out front at the NABJ convention in Boston next month. We are very proud to have a special workshop, “JournoPreneurs: What It Takes To Build A Media Company,” that is being sponsored by the  John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

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Tracie Powell

DJTF Co-char Tracie Powell, owner of the All Digitocracy blog, said that with all the upheaval in the industry,more and more journalists of color are choosing to produce and distribute their own content instead of begging for jobs. “Whether we are doing it intentionally or not, we’re creating and launching our own media ventures or trying to, but we’re doing so on a prayer and a string,” she said. “We haven’t the faintest clue about business plans, market studies or venture capitalism. We are already entrepreneurial, but do we know how to take that next step and truly become entrepreneurs?”

Powell feels that journalists need to know how to apply their unique skills to being an entrepreneur. “As journalists the skills we have are necessary in the startup world. We are articulate and determined. Our ability to clearly communicate ideas to others, especially those unfamiliar with a given issue, can translate into success explaining and generating excitement from venture capitalists. Finally, we have the tenacity to pursue a challenging story; that same tenacity can be used to aggressively seek funding and gain users.”

“What we need is to better understand the difference between building a personal brand versus building a media company, and we need to know how to take an idea from concept to launch. That’s what this workshop is all about,” she said.

The workshop will start by helping attendees figure out if they really want to start their own businesses, said Powell. “If the answer is yes, then we will have the opportunity to talk face-to-face with media entrepreneurs who are already doing this,” she said. “Those of us who are really ready to make the leap will not only learn from the panelists’ expertise at the convention, we will leave with the workings of a business plan in hand and a possible mentor.”

So many journalists of color have been laid off and downsized, people with real talent, knowledge and skills that are of benefit to the industry and to their communities, said Powell. “That should not and cannot go to waste. We have journalism skills that we can apply to being entrepreneurs, heck, many of us are already doing it and don’t even know it. So why not?” she asked. “What else are you doing besides begging for a limited number of newsroom jobs, working for somebody else when you really want to work for yourself?”

There are whole communities that are consistently ignored by mainstream newsrooms, Powell observed. “Launching our own media companies — whether it be developing mobile news apps, websites or innovative tools that connect communities with the information they need to strengthen our democracy — is one way we get to do the important work that we crave and that our communities need,” she said. “This is especially true as many of us find ourselves displaced and unemployed.”

Powell called the speakers for JournoPreneurs her personal dream panel. The panel consists of entrepreneurs at varying stages in the launch process, which will make this even more interesting and beneficial to those in attendance. “I thought of everybody that I would want to meet and learn from, then I invited them to Boston,” she said. “Of course, the Knight Foundation stepped in and offered to help make connections with some of the panelists and they also gave the task force some money to help turn the dream panel into a reality. That was a real plus.”

“We wouldn’t be here without them. I wouldn’t be here without them. I’m really looking forward to this being the start of something truly special in terms of nurturing our members and equipping them with the tools to become digital media entrepreneurs,” Powell said about the Knight Foundation. “I’m serious about this being a long-term project and a long-term relationship, not just some one-off chance encounter at the convention, and I believe Knight is too.”

Powell hopes that attendees will walk away from the workshop with a business plan and a mentor. “We’re looking to identify promising ventures by a handful of journalists and hope to bring those media entrepreneurs back together in the next couple of months at a entrepreneurial media institute, or at the very least, enable them to meet personally with their mentors,” she said. “That part is still a work in progress, but it will all start at the convention in Boston.”

The workshop is on Thursday, July 31 from 2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

JournoPreneurs: What It Takes To Build A Media Company

When it comes to digital media innovation, journalists of color are largely missing from the landscape. Earlier this year, the American Society of News Editors surveyed 68 online news organizations about the percentage of journalists of color inside their newsrooms and found that 43 sites didn’t have any person of color on staff. Meanwhile, more journalists, including journalists of color, are creating their own media companies or hyperlocal sites. JournoPreneurs: How To Build Your Own Media Company will provide hands-on experience with drafting business plans, filing articles of incorporation, advice on how to access funding and build teams as well as concrete steps on how to launch a media company and what happens after the launch. #nabj

Panelists:

Michael Bolden, Knight Foundation

Ezra Klein, Co-Founder, Vox Media

Carlos Watson, Founder, Ozy.com

Kelly Virella, Founder, Dominion of New York and The Urban Thinker

Benét J. Wilson is the vice president of education for the NABJ Digital Journalism Task Force.  She also serves on the board of the Online News Association.  She is  the social media/eNewsletters editor for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and  a freelance aviation journalist and blogger.

10 Things to Do NOW to Prepare for #NABJ14

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The 2014 NABJ Annual Convention and Career Fair is coming up fast. In order to have a successful convention, you need to be prepared. Below are 10 things you need to do now to be on your game in Boston.

  1. Buy your plane ticket. The closer you get to the convention date, the more expensive that air fare will be. I bought my Baltimore-Boston ticket in March on Southwest Airlines for $124 round trip (and if you we’re following @NABJDigital or @AvQueenBenet, you would have known I shared the deal). They are now running a shade under $200. Search Airfarewatchdog.com for lowest fares and fare alerts.
  2. Business cards. Get them now. Vistaprint has a great selection and you can get 500 for as little as $10. You can even get free cards (minus shipping costs) that sport an ad on the back.
  3. Resume/online portfolio. Now is the time to tighten up that resume and freshen up or create an online portfolio to impress recruiters at the convention. Need help? Check our the DJTF webinars covering online portfolios and resumes that we did in January. They’re free to watch, but you must register.
  4. Find ways to save money. Going to convention is not cheap, but you can do it and not break the bank. Find folks to share a hotel room at the NABJ Convention Roommate Bureau. If you’re checking a bag, tuck some non-perishable snacks and water. Reach out on our listserves and social media channels for ride shares to and from the airport.  Check out sites like Yelp and Urban Spoon to find nearby places to eat that are less expensive than the hotel. And search Hotwire and Priceline for nearby hotel deals.
  5. Look at the convention schedule. Work out a plan on what workshops you want to attend and create a schedule.
  6. Check out the exhibitors and recruiters (not posted yet, but the site says coming soon). See who will be in Boston and start prioritizing who are the must-see employers on your list.
  7. Start making appointments. The schedules of those attending the conference are very tight. Call folks now to set up interview/chat times. And consider breakfast meetings, since schedules tend to slip as the day goes by.
  8. Check your wardrobe. See what clothes fit and what don’t. See what needs to be cleaned or altered. And if you need to buy things, do it  now.
  9. Check your social media profile. Google yourself and see what comes up. Check your Facebook profile and make sure there are no embarrassing photos or posts, because potential employers will be checking.
  10. Hang out with your friends now. The convention is the time to meet new people and grow your network. It is not the time to hang with the same group of people you do at home, because as much as you love them, they are not going to get you a job.